InterNACHI "The Inspectors Journal®"

Inspection article newly translated into French: Les Panneaux de Distribution Électrique (Electrical Service Panels)

June 25th, 2013

For Canadian and other French-speaking members, post this InterNACHI article on your website, which has been newly translated into French and discusses tips for inspecting electrical service panels at residential properties:  Les Panneaux de Distribution Électrique.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

Consumer article newly translated into French: La Sécurité Électrique (Electrical Safety)

May 23rd, 2013

For Canadian and other French-speaking members, post this InterNACHI consumer article on your website, which has been newly translated into French and discusses the hazards and precautions for dealing with household electricity:  La Sécurité Électrique.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

Inspection article newly translated into French: L’Inspection des Clôtures Électriques (Electric Fence Inspection)

May 14th, 2013

For Canadian and other French-speaking members, post this InterNACHI article on your website, which has been newly translated into French and discusses the dangers of and some pointers for inspecting electric fences at residential properties:  L’Inspection des Clôtures Électriques.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

New consumer article: The 10 Best Places to Hide Valuables in Your Home

May 8th, 2013
Burglars are generally lazy (why else choose crime as a career?), and it’s this very characteristic that homeowners and renters can exploit to protect themselves in case their homes get broken into.  One way is to find unusual places to keep your valuables, both hidden and in plain sight.  Read about some of the best places to hide your precious items (as well as some of the worst places, and why) in our new consumer article:  The 10 Best Places to Hide Valuables in Your Home.
This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

Consumer article newly translated into French: La Sécurité du Domicile des Personnes Âgées (Home Safety for the Elderly)

May 7th, 2013

For Canadian and other French-speaking members, post this InterNACHI article on your website, which has been newly translated into French and covers the hazards and solutions for keeping elderly occupants safe in their homes:  La Sécurité du Domicile des Personnes Âgées.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

New inspection article: Memo to Real Estate Professionals RE: Inspecting Crawlspaces with Water

May 7th, 2013

InterNACHI’s message board has seen several threads about the hidden hazards of inspecting crawlspaces, especially those that are particularly damp or have standing water.  Not only can you not inspect what you can’t see, but you also may be in for a nasty surprise by forging ahead based on the pressure of a home sale.  We advise erring on the side of caution at all times and have put the real estate profession on notice in our Memo to Real Estate Professionals RE:  Inspecting Crawlspaces with Water.  Print it and hand it out the next time you find yourself put on the spot.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

Inspection article newly translated into French: L’Efflorescence pour les Inspecteurs (Efflorescence for Inspectors)

April 3rd, 2013

For Canadian and other French-speaking members, post this InterNACHI article on your website, which has been newly translated into French and explains the causes and prevention of efflorescence that forms on masonry:  L’Efflorescence pour les Inspecteurs.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

Inspection article newly translated into French: Inspection Relative à la Prévention des Risques Sismiques

March 15th, 2013

For Canadian and other French-speaking members, post this InterNACHI article on your website, which has been newly translated into French and explains the importance of preparing a home in the event of an earthquake:  Inspection Relative à la Prévention des Risques Sismiques.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

New inspection article: Home Inspector Safety & the Dangers of Arc Flashes

February 6th, 2013

One of the most dangerous parts of a home inspection is the electrical portion.  Electricity can behave in unexpected ways if there is any damage to a component or if other conditions exist that permit a current to jump from its intended path.  An arc flash is one of the greatest and most lethal hazards involved in electrical system maintenance and inspection.  Home inspectors should know the risks and precautions they should take to avoid this potentially deadly threat by reading our latest article:  Home Inspector Safety & the Dangers of Arc Flashes.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

New consumer and inspection article: Homeowner Maintenance: Changing the HVAC Filter

January 25th, 2013

Failing to perform simple home maintenance tasks can lead to some serious consequences.  One of the easier tasks is changing the furnace or HVAC filter.  Homeowners may need to do it every three months, but there are conditions that require it to be done more frequently.  Find out what those conditions are and why it’s so important to stay on top of this task in the first place in our latest article:  Homeowner Maintenance: Changing the HVAC Filter.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

New inspection article: How InterNACHI Calculates its Continuing Education Credit Hours

January 11th, 2013

Ever wonder how InterNACHI determines how many credit hours to assign to its various online and video training courses?   Contrary to what some people think, it’s a matter just a little more complicated than figuring out how long it takes a member to complete the course.  It’s actually based on a formula devised, in part, by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy, and the IRS.  Read about it in our new article:  How InterNACHI Calculates its Continuing Education Credit Hours.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

New inspector and consumer article: The Duty to Warn: A Home Inspector’s and Home Seller’s Guide to Immediate Hazards

December 31st, 2012

Inspectors are somewhat divided on the question of when to breach their client’s confidentiality for when (or whether) to warn a non-client about an imminent danger on an inspected property.  Depending on the hazard, some inspectors wouldn’t think twice, while others are concerned about ensuring everyone’s safety versus minimizing their own liability.  This article discusses the pros and cons for both homeowners and home inspectors:  The Duty to Warn:  A Home Inspector’s and Home Seller’s Guide to Immediate Hazards.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

Inspection article newly translated into French: Inspection des Acariens (Dust Mite Inspection)

December 18th, 2012

For Canadian and other French-speaking members, post this InterNACHI article on your website, which has been newly translated into French and explains the problems caused for sensitive people by the ubiquitous household dust mite:  Inspection des Acariens  (Dust Mite Inspection).

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

Inspection article newly translated into French: Sécurité et Conduits d’Évacuation des Sécheuses (Dryer Vent Safety)

December 12th, 2012

For Canadian and other French-speaking members, post this InterNACHI article on your website, which has been newly translated into French and explains the importance of properly locating the clothes dryer vent and regularly cleaning its lint trap to prevent a potential house fire:   Sécurité et Conduits d’Évacuation des Sécheuses (Dryer Vent Safety).

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.

New inspection article: Doing Damage During an Inspection: It’s Your Job

December 10th, 2012

At some point, every inspector is going to damage something at a home in the course of his or her inspection.  If you think such a situation is an unfortunate mishap that paints you in a negative light and will cost you both in terms of your fee and future referrals, guess what?  You’re wrong.  Read why the very opposite is true in our new inspection article:  Doing Damage During an Inspection:  It’s Your Job.

This blog entry was posted by Kate Tarasenko.