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Writing Inspection Reports in the Past Tense

April 16th, 2010

Should inspectors write their report observations in the past tense?

I say, “Yes.” It may help reduce your liability.

Isn’t the report a document stating the condition of the property at the time of the inspection? Yes. Then why use the present tense?

Read “Inspection Reports:  Past or Present Tense?” here.

This blog entry was posted by Ben Gromicko.

Washington State Home Inspector Licensing Board approves InterNACHI’s free, online courses.

January 28th, 2010

InterNACHI is pleased to announce that the Washington State Licensing Board has approved InterNACHI’s free, online inspector training courses including:

  • How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior course for 14 hours of home inspector continuing education.
  • Electrical Inspection course for 4 hours of home inspector education.
  • Safe Practices for the Home Inspector course for 4 hours of home inspector education.
  • How to Perform Exterior Inspections for 16 hours of home inspector education.
  • How to Inspect HVAC Systems course for 12 hours of home inspector education.
  • Structural Issues for Home Inspectors for 4 hours of home inspector education.
  • Roofing Inspection course for 4 hours of home inspector education.
  • Residential Plumbing Overview for Inspectors course for 8 hours.
  • Moisture Intrusion Inspections for 8 hours.
  • Deck Inspections course for 3 hours of home inspector education.

CLICK HERE to see actual approvals from the Home Inspector Advisory Licensing Board of the Department of Licensing.

This blog entry was posted by Nick Gromicko.

Tennesee approved another one of InterNACHI’s free, online home inspector continuing education courses.

January 9th, 2010
InterNACHI is pleased to announce that the State of Tennessee, Department of Commerce and Insurance, Division of Regulatory Board, Home Inspector Licensing Division has approved InterNACHI’s free, online “How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior” course today for 14 hours.
Tennessee has also approved the following courses:
InterNACHI’s free pre-licensing courses have also been approved by the State of Tennesse for home inspector pre-licensing and continuing education. CLICK HERE for information on free pre-licensing courses and becoming a licensed home inspector in Tennessee.

And the  State of Tennessee Real Estate Commission approved InterNACHI’s What Every Real Estate Agent Needs to Know about Home Inspections course for 4 hours of CE.

InterNACHI is also approved in bordering states:

InterNACHI… #1 in inspector education!

CLICK HERE for the BEST INSPECTORS IN TENNESSEE

This blog entry was posted by Nick Gromicko.

Oklahoma approves InterNACHI’s online courses for pre-licensing and continuing education.

December 28th, 2009

InterNACHI is pleased to announce that today the Oklahoma Committee of Home Inspector Examiners approved InerNACHI’s free, online home inspection courses for pre-licensing of home inspectors.  InterNACHI’s 134-hour pre-licensing course was approved along with two other free, online inspector courses.

Oklahoma had previously approved InterNACHI’s free, online home inspection courses for continuing education purposes.

For more information visit the Oklahoma home inspector approved education page.

This blog entry was posted by Nick Gromicko.

Inspector Selection, A Real Estate Agent’s Duty.

August 9th, 2009
By Nick Gromicko
Former REALTOR
Founder, International Association of Certified Home Inspectors

The seller has accepted your clients’ offer and now with your help, your clients must choose a home inspector.   Should you steer them toward the inspector who writes the softest reports?  Should you steer them toward the inspector that pays to be on your office’s preferred vendor list?  Should you help them find the cheapest inspector?  The answers to these questions are of course no, no, and hell no.

You have fiduciary duty to your client and therefore must recommend the very best inspectors.  If you recommend a patty-cake inspector, an inspector who indirectly pays for your recommendation, or a cheap inspector, you violate your fiduciary duty to your client.

The National Association of REALTORs defines your duties in their Code of EthicsArticle 1 requires you to protect and promote your client’s interests.  Article 6 requires you to disclose any financial benefit you may receive from recommending related real estate services (this includes benefit to your broker also).

Because most real estate agents only get paid if the real estate transaction successfully takes place, your personal interests and your fiduciary duties already conflict.  Don’t make your situation any worse.  The best way to avoid negligent referral claims, operate ethically, and fulfill your fiduciary duty is to help your client find an inspector based solely on merit.  And although no real estate agent can guarantee the thoroughness of any particular inspector, there is a strong correlation between an inspector’s fees and his/her competence (you get what you pay for).  Helping your client find a cheap inspector during the purchase of their lifetime, is a violation of your fiduciary duty.    When in doubt, shop price, and seek out the most expensive inspectors for your clients.

This blog entry was posted by Nick Gromicko.

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