discoloration in linoleum

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discoloration in linoleum

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Walt Hoffman
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Posted: Nov 9, 2005 9:29 AM       Post Subject:

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Does anyone know what causes discoloration ( typically a pale blue) in linoleum in moisture prone areas such as around toilets and next to tubs? I have heard mold, mildew, and sheet vinyl adhesive reactions. I am specifically wondering about any negative consequences such as mold spreading to other areas, etc. Thank you for any feedback
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Gerry Beaumont

Gerry Beaumont Consulting
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Posted: Nov 9, 2005 10:24 AM       Post Subject:
Hi to all,

Walt, I looked a while ago for information on this topic and never really found the full answer, but here is a link I saved at the time:

http://www.ntlfloortrends.com/CDA/ArticleInformation/coverstory/BNPCoverStoryItem/0,2913,78914,00.html

BTW, vinyl and linoleum flooring are not the same thing, vinyl is a petrochemical product, whereas Linoleum is made of naturally occouring materials/

Regards

Gerry

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Gerry Beaumont
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Bill Emelander

Professional Edge Home Inspection
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Posted: Nov 9, 2005 1:29 PM       Post Subject:
I have seen this in the past. What I found on mine was the toilet leaked and the blue cube they put in the tank to keep it clean is what caused the stain.

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Jay Moge
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Posted: Nov 9, 2005 9:58 PM       Post Subject:

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i asked our sub. contracted flooring guys and did some of my own reserch and found that what most people don't uderstand is that "lenoleum" today is actualy vynal. and that layer is very very thin. it's bonded to a material with a special glue, the 2 products together is what adds up to the 1/8th inch of material we see. when it get wet and dries the vynal seperates from the base material and the byproduct of the wet glue and base material turns either a gray, or blue-ish color. alot like a water stain, but the base material is sometimes recycled paper and has some remains of inks that were the original paper use. actual lenoleum will handle water much better, but more likely to crack when it dries. hope that help. in any case if you see that discoloring you can bet that the floor has been wet or flooded at one point. icon_cool.gif icon_wink.gif
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George Martin

Martin Home Inspection LLC
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Posted: Dec 3, 2005 1:58 PM       Post Subject:
I've come across this a few times. One explanation is the flooring will absorb chemical from certain rubber-backed throw-rugs.
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Gary Porter

GLPs Home and Mold Inspections LLC
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Posted: Dec 4, 2005 12:22 AM       Post Subject:
Good info.
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Ted Roberts

Central Washington Home Inspections
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Posted: Dec 4, 2005 12:45 AM       Post Subject:
This will be mostly around the toilet where a wax ring is leaking, in all the cases that I have found when tested with a moisture meter it will have levels of moisture in the sub floor. It will not dry out on it's own because it can not get air exposure and the vynal will need to be removed. Some times the sub floor can be dryed out if it is not been leaking long but in most cases that I have been involved in as a contractor the vynal and sub floor will need to be replaced.
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Erby Crofutt

B4U Close Home Inspections & Radon Testing
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Posted: Dec 4, 2005 9:08 AM       Post Subject:
It's just a chemical reaction between the glues in the vinyl flooring and the water, any water.


[ Image: Water at toilet ]


[ Image: Water under door ]
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John Springstead

Home Inspections of USA
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Posted: Dec 4, 2005 10:02 PM       Post Subject:
You mean a reaction from "water" entering from "below" the top layer, correct?
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Jay Moge
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Posted: Dec 5, 2005 11:01 PM       Post Subject:

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John.

that's correct. water can not get threw vinyl. Vinyl is water proof, but anytime you have a seem or any cutout in the vinyl, water can get threw. you can still get real lenolium, it's beautiful inlays go threw the entire thickness and are rather pricey now that vinyl has flooded the market. but then again vinyl took over about 20 years ago, but still was called leno' for about 15 years after. even floor co. didn't want you to know it was a cheap "laminate" imitation of a previosly "cheap" floor. oh well. icon_cool.gif icon_wink.gif
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