New article for inspectors: Inspecting Gutters and Downspouts

Different climates and even different jurisdictions have their own rules when it comes to residential guttering systems. Home inspectors should be aware of the requirements for their particular service area, and be prepared to inform their clients of the potential problems that an inadequate, damaged or neglected system can cause by reading Inspecting Gutters and Downspouts.

New inspection article: Inspecting Grounding and Bonding at Residential Swimming Pools

Inspecting pools and spas falls outside the scope of a general home inspection.  But as more homeowners in warmer climates and in upscale neighborhoods install in-ground pools, home inspectors should consider learning about the electrical hazards that may be present by reading Inspecting Grounding and Bonding at Residential Swimming Pools.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Solar Roofing Shingles

Optimum energy efficiency is a major target for new housing, but existing homes can be retrofitted to experience the same lowered energy bills and a decreased carbon footprint.  Although inspecting solar power systems is beyond the scope of a standard home inspection, it’s useful for inspectors to have a basic knowledge of them as they become more commonplace.  Read our latest article by Roberta Farsetta, a 20-year veteran of the inspection industry, and spouse of Certified Master Inspector® and Chair of InterNACHI’s Ethics and Standards of Practice Committee:  Inspecting Solar Roofing Shingles.

New six-part inspection article series: The Home Inspector’s Guide to Air Duct Cleaning

Maintaining the home’s HVAC system is vital to keep it running efficiently and holding down energy costs.  But is cleaning out the ductwork part of that strategy?  It may surprise some homeowners and a few home inspectors to learn that the answer is a firm “maybe, maybe not.”  Having the ductwork professionally cleaned may be an appropriate course of action if the system has been contaminated by moisture or mold, but, absent these issues, it may create more issues than it solves. A general amount of airborne dust in a home is normal; homeowners shouldn’t try to fix a problem that doesn’t exist. But before making any recommendations to your clients, read more about it in our six-part article series:  The Home Inspector’s Guide to Air Duct Cleaning.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting GFCI and AFCI Protection

Although home inspectors are considered generalists and are discouraged from quoting code in their inspection reports, it’s always a good idea to be familiar with the latest requirements, especially regarding residential electrical systems.  Read this primer for some updates in the 2015 International Residential Code (IRC):  Inspecting GFCI and AFCI Protection.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Gas-Fired Boilers

Energy efficiency is now a major consideration for new home construction, but even older homes without state-of-the-art appliances can benefit from being retrofitted, either entirely or via certain components.  Inspectors should be aware of these options, as well as the many configurations and multiple uses of heating appliances, by reading Inspecting Gas-Fired Boilers.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting for Air Sealing at Kitchen and Bathroom Exhaust Fans

The majority of new home construction is deadline-driven, which means that, sometimes, minor but essential work may be performed haphazardly or not at all.  This is especially true of sealing around exhaust fans and ductwork.  If the opening cut for the installation of the fan box or duct leaves large gaps around the unit, air can escape into unconditioned spaces and create airflow and moisture problems that don’t reveal themselves until they become critical.  Proper installation at the outset can help prevent such issues.  Inspectors can read more about them in Inspecting for Air Sealing at Kitchen and Bathroom Exhaust Fans.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Ducted Returns

Inspectors who inspect homes that are being built or retrofitted with newer HVAC systems should know something about ductwork and air returns.  Making sure that airflow and return air are being moved through the system properly is vital for energy efficiency and comfort.  Read more in Inspecting Ducted Returns.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Whole-House Dehumidification Systems

Cooling is essential for homes in regions that experience hot weather.  And it’s vital to get the right installation and balance for homes in climates that are particularly humid.  Find out more by reading Inspecting Whole-House Dehumidification Systems.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Compression Cooling Systems

New homes are being built to be more airtight and energy-efficient. That’s why it’s more important than ever to make sure that their cooling systems are properly sized and installed.  Whether your clients are in the process of building their home, or you’re inspecting their existing home, don’t let them waste money or energy.  Read up on some helpful tips in Inspecting Compression Cooling Systems.