New inspection article: Inspecting for Defects in Older Buildings

Inspectors who’ve been in the business for a while can probably know what kinds of problems they’ll run into based on the age of the house alone. We’ve assembled a handful of the most common defects found in old homes so you waste less time recognizing them. Take a look at our new article on inspecting for defects in older buildings.

New inspection article: Ungrounded Electrical Receptacles

Ungrounded electrical receptacles can be unsafe, especially if they’re used to power large appliances that are designed to be grounded. Homeowners have a number of options if they’d like to modernize their ungrounded electrical systems, but they should avoid common quick fixes that may make the situation more dangerous. Read about the subject in our new article on ungrounded electrical receptacles.

New inspection article: Solar Panel Fires and Electrical Hazards

Photovoltaic arrays are an exciting new possibility when considering saving money on energy. But they can potentially be hazardous to firefighting operations if the proper guidelines are not followed. Learn how to make sure that solar panel systems remain a safe and effective tool for harvesting solar energy in our new article on solar panel fires and electrical hazards.

New inspection article: Polyurethane Spray Foam Insulation

Polyurethane foam insulation can be sprayed into locations in either closed cell or open cell form. Closed cell has a higher R-value but it’s more expensive, while open cell is a better sound barrier. Find out more about where these insulation types are appropriate and where they’re a bad idea in our new article on polyurethane spray foam insulation.

New inspection article: Unvented Roof Assemblies

Roofs are typically vented, but unvented roof assembles are becoming more common as proponents argue they can actually be more energy efficient and comfortable for occupants. That is, if they’re constructed right. Find out about their alleged benefits and what critics have to say about them in our new article on unvented roof assemblies.

New inspection article: Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time (DST) is about to end, meaning we’ll have an extra hour to sleep in on Sunday. It also means that, according to proponents of DST, homes and businesses have saved energy over the past six months, primarily through reduced time using electric lights. But many experts now believe that DST does not promote energy efficiency and that it might in fact cause homeowners to use more electricity. Find out about the history and controversy surrounding DST in our new article on daylight saving time.