New six-part inspection article series: The Home Inspector’s Guide to Air Duct Cleaning

Maintaining the home’s HVAC system is vital to keep it running efficiently and holding down energy costs.  But is cleaning out the ductwork part of that strategy?  It may surprise some homeowners and a few home inspectors to learn that the answer is a firm “maybe, maybe not.”  Having the ductwork professionally cleaned may be an appropriate course of action if the system has been contaminated by moisture or mold, but, absent these issues, it may create more issues than it solves. A general amount of airborne dust in a home is normal; homeowners shouldn’t try to fix a problem that doesn’t exist. But before making any recommendations to your clients, read more about it in our six-part article series:  The Home Inspector’s Guide to Air Duct Cleaning.

New article for home inspectors: Inspecting Step and Kick-Out Flashing at Roof-Wall Intersections

Moisture intrusion is one of the most serious problems a home can experience.  It can lead to rapid deterioration of many structural components.  Home inspectors can familiarize themselves with the best practices for installing some basic roof components that will help prevent water damage by reading Inspecting Step and Kick-Out Flashing at Roof-Wall Intersections.

New article for home inspectors: Inspecting Added Blown Insulation in an Existing Vented Attic

Energy efficiency is a top priority for homeowners.  Advising clients on how to lower their heating and cooling costs while maintaining comfort is important for home inspectors.  When homeowners have taken steps to make improvements, there are special inspection considerations.  Read some useful tips in our latest article:  Inspecting Added Blown Insulation in an Existing Vented Attic.

New inspection article: Inspecting the HVAC System for Duct Leaks and Energy Loss

Home inspectors can help ensure that their clients’ HVAC systems are running optimally by checking the system’s duct seams.  There are key points where air leakage is common, as well as specific types of materials that should be sued to remedy any energy loss.  Read more:  Inspecting the HVAC System for Duct Leaks and Energy Loss.

Writing Inspection Reports in the Past Tense

Should inspectors write their report observations in the past tense?

I say, “Yes.” It may help reduce your liability.

Isn’t the report a document stating the condition of the property at the time of the inspection? Yes. Then why use the present tense?

Read “Inspection Reports:  Past or Present Tense?” here.