New article for inspectors: Inspecting Gas-Fired Boilers

Energy efficiency is now a major consideration for new home construction, but even older homes without state-of-the-art appliances can benefit from being retrofitted, either entirely or via certain components.  Inspectors should be aware of these options, as well as the many configurations and multiple uses of heating appliances, by reading Inspecting Gas-Fired Boilers.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting for Air Sealing at Kitchen and Bathroom Exhaust Fans

The majority of new home construction is deadline-driven, which means that, sometimes, minor but essential work may be performed haphazardly or not at all.  This is especially true of sealing around exhaust fans and ductwork.  If the opening cut for the installation of the fan box or duct leaves large gaps around the unit, air can escape into unconditioned spaces and create airflow and moisture problems that don’t reveal themselves until they become critical.  Proper installation at the outset can help prevent such issues.  Inspectors can read more about them in Inspecting for Air Sealing at Kitchen and Bathroom Exhaust Fans.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Compression Cooling Systems

New homes are being built to be more airtight and energy-efficient. That’s why it’s more important than ever to make sure that their cooling systems are properly sized and installed.  Whether your clients are in the process of building their home, or you’re inspecting their existing home, don’t let them waste money or energy.  Read up on some helpful tips in Inspecting Compression Cooling Systems.

New article from The Home Depot: A Guide to Engineered Wood Sheathing for Inspectors and DIY-ers

In partnership with The Home Depot, InterNACHI is pleased to present an article on engineered wood sheathing.  Like OSB, it’s a sturdy and lightweight alternative to hardwood and has many applications.  Read more about it in A Guide to Engineered Wood Sheathing for Inspectors and DIY-ers.

New article on lumber grade stamps

Lumber grade stamps are placed on lumber before it leaves the mill but few people understand the purpose of these stamps or how to read them. The most important piece of information on a grade stamp is the grade itself, but much more is included. Did you know that lumber that has been harvested sustainably or treated with fire-suppressant chemicals can be identified by markings on their stamp? Take a look at our new article on lumber grade stamps to find out more.

New article on green lumber

Most homes are built using green lumber, which is just another term for wood that is still wet. The problem is that when wet wood dries it’s going to shrink, and when parts of your house shrink it can mean trouble. Nail pops are sometimes caused by wood shrinkage, although this isn’t a serious problem. Mold, however, can easily grow on green lumber and infest the wood before it’s even used in construction. For more information, take a look at our new article on green lumber.