New article: Sewer Scope Inspections for Home Inspectors

While performing a sewer scope inspection falls outside InterNACHI’s Home Inspection Standards of Practice, many home inspectors offer it as an ancillary service because the information it yields can be very useful for homeowners, as well as prospective home buyers. Home inspectors can familiarize themselves with the equipment, protocols, and benefits of a sewer scope inspection when deciding whether to offer this service by reading Sewer Scope Inspections for Home Inspectors.

New article for inspectors: Shingle Gauges for Property Inspectors

Inspectors need to carry all kinds of tools with them in order to perform accurate inspections.  Shingle gauges are small tools that help home inspectors – as well as roofing contractors and insurance adjusters – determine the wear and tear of asphalt shingles, along with any possible manufacturer’s defects that may prematurely shorten their service life.  Read more about these handy tools that home inspectors can use during the roof portion of their home inspections in Shingle Gauges for Property Inspectors.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Liquid Vinyl Siding

As homeowners and homebuilders opt for more attractive and lower-maintenance products and components for house exteriors, home inspectors should become more familiar with them to knowledgeably assess their condition and report on their defects.  Although liquid vinyl siding has been around for more than 30 years, it’s not necessarily easy to identify.  Learn more about what makes LVS desirable and popular by reading Inspecting Liquid Vinyl Siding.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Gutters and Downspouts

Different climates and even different jurisdictions have their own rules when it comes to residential guttering systems. Home inspectors should be aware of the requirements for their particular service area, and be prepared to inform their clients of the potential problems that an inadequate, damaged or neglected system can cause by reading Inspecting Gutters and Downspouts.

New six-part inspection article series: The Home Inspector’s Guide to Air Duct Cleaning

Maintaining the home’s HVAC system is vital to keep it running efficiently and holding down energy costs.  But is cleaning out the ductwork part of that strategy?  It may surprise some homeowners and a few home inspectors to learn that the answer is a firm “maybe, maybe not.”  Having the ductwork professionally cleaned may be an appropriate course of action if the system has been contaminated by moisture or mold, but, absent these issues, it may create more issues than it solves. A general amount of airborne dust in a home is normal; homeowners shouldn’t try to fix a problem that doesn’t exist. But before making any recommendations to your clients, read more about it in our six-part article series:  The Home Inspector’s Guide to Air Duct Cleaning.

New business article for inspectors: Four RESPA-Compliant Holiday Gifts for Agents That Promote Your Inspection Company

Marketing your inspection business is as important as performing accurate inspections and delivering high-quality reports.  But in addition to netting prospective clients, you also need to appeal to real estate agents, and this sometimes means going above and beyond what other inspectors do.  With the holidays rolling around, we’ve taken some of the guesswork out of gift-giving that’s both RESPA-compliant and useful for agents, as well as your business.  Read more in Four RESPA-Compliant Holiday Gifts for Agents That Promote Your Inspection Company.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Gas-Fired Boilers

Energy efficiency is now a major consideration for new home construction, but even older homes without state-of-the-art appliances can benefit from being retrofitted, either entirely or via certain components.  Inspectors should be aware of these options, as well as the many configurations and multiple uses of heating appliances, by reading Inspecting Gas-Fired Boilers.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting for Air Sealing at Kitchen and Bathroom Exhaust Fans

The majority of new home construction is deadline-driven, which means that, sometimes, minor but essential work may be performed haphazardly or not at all.  This is especially true of sealing around exhaust fans and ductwork.  If the opening cut for the installation of the fan box or duct leaves large gaps around the unit, air can escape into unconditioned spaces and create airflow and moisture problems that don’t reveal themselves until they become critical.  Proper installation at the outset can help prevent such issues.  Inspectors can read more about them in Inspecting for Air Sealing at Kitchen and Bathroom Exhaust Fans.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Whole-House Dehumidification Systems

Cooling is essential for homes in regions that experience hot weather.  And it’s vital to get the right installation and balance for homes in climates that are particularly humid.  Find out more by reading Inspecting Whole-House Dehumidification Systems.

New article for inspectors: Inspecting Evaporative Cooling Systems

Before the weather heats up, it’s important to have a home’s cooling system serviced so that it runs optimally.  And it’s just as important to have the right size system installed in the first place – not just based on the size of the home, but also the home’s climate zone.  Evaporative cooling systems are affordable alternatives to conventional central air-conditioning systems, but they don’t work everywhere.  Find out more about them by reading Inspecting Evaporative Cooling Systems.