Go Back   InterNACHI Inspection Forum > Specific Inspection Topics > Exterior Inspections

Notices

Exterior Inspections Contains discussions about the exterior portion of a home inspection. This includes roofs, gutters, downspouts, decks, patios, windows, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #61  
Old 12/27/16, 8:26 PM
Roy MacGregor Roy MacGregor is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 29
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

Sump pumps should be operated as part of a home inspection by adding water to the pit or by lifting the float switch. The pump should be on its own circuit and be able to pump the water low enough so the drain tile leaders can drain completely. Drainage can be improved in plastic pits by perforating the pit walls with some eighth inch holes below the drain tile leaders. Look and smell for black water and sewage odors there may be waste water leaking from plumbing drainage. All pits should have lids to prevent tripping and falls. Check the pump discharge location, it should be 20 feet away from the house.
Reply With Quote
Need a home inspection in Hawaii? Check out InterNACHI's listing of Hawaii certified home inspectors. Or, find a home inspector anywhere in the world with our inspection search engine.
  #62  
Old 12/27/16, 8:30 PM
Samuel D. Fetty's Avatar
Samuel D. Fetty Samuel D. Fetty is online now
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Naples all SWFL
Posts: 8,019
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

Quote:
Originally Posted by rmacgregor View Post
Sump pumps should be operated as part of a home inspection by adding water to the pit or by lifting the float switch. The pump should be on its own circuit and be able to pump the water low enough so the drain tile leaders can drain completely. Drainage can be improved in plastic pits by perforating the pit walls with some eighth inch holes below the drain tile leaders. Look and smell for black water and sewage odors there may be waste water leaking from plumbing drainage. All pits should have lids to prevent tripping and falls. Check the pump discharge location, it should be 20 feet away from the house.
Not sure what this has to do with tree inspections




Dave Fetty Certified Master Inspector
Florida Home Inspection And Property Services LLC
www.FHIAPS.COM
www.NaplesBestInspector.com
www.FortMyersInspector.com
Naples, Marco Island, Ft. Myers, Bonita Springs, Estero, Cape Coral
Dfetty@FHIAPS.COM
http://https://www.facebook.com/pages/Flori...2450912?ref=hl
Florida Radon Measurement Technician R2547
(239)339-7380
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 1/6/17, 12:14 PM
Mark Ediger Mark Ediger is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Topeka, Kansas
Posts: 16
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

perform-tree-inspections-course-20161221_112856.jpg

perform-tree-inspections-course-20161221_111952.jpgThe home inspected had multiple trees that were generally planted too close to the structure. The tree pictured was already in contact with the structure and had caused damage to the gutter and roof edge. The tree had multiple trunks and a weak “V” shaped stem union that was cracked and overhanging the roof. It was recommended that the tree be removed by a qualified contractor.



Mark Ediger
Heritage Inspections
www.heritageinspectionstopeka.com
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 1/6/17, 1:43 PM
Mark Ediger Mark Ediger is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Topeka, Kansas
Posts: 16
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

The article researched was “Defensible Space”. The article showed the importance of being aware of the larger area around the home in relation to mitigating the chance for damage from wildfires. Although I don’t inspect a lot of homes on heavily treed lots or tracts of land, this was a good reminder to inform clients of all site conditions beyond the house. Several important points brought out were that an accessible area for fire trucks should be present/created, and if a pond is present, access to the site should be kept clear.



Mark Ediger
Heritage Inspections
www.heritageinspectionstopeka.com
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 1/7/17, 9:31 PM
Louis Kovacs Louis Kovacs is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Chino, CA
Posts: 123
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

I have what appears to be a straight, healthy, deciduous magnolia tree. This tree typically grows greater than 40 ft. and sheds leaves all year around. The tree is located approximately 20 ft from the structure. My only recommendation would be to prune the foliage around and over the structure, particularly nearest the chimney primarily for fire protection, since the chimney does not have a cap and spark arrestor. Additionally to prevent leaves from collecting on the rooftop.

perform-tree-inspections-course-imgp1428.jpg
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 1/7/17, 9:53 PM
Louis Kovacs Louis Kovacs is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Jul 2016
Location: Chino, CA
Posts: 123
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

In reference to article "Fire Safety for the Home" item 4 titled "Give space heaters space" provided information on distance from walls and reminders to unplug when not in use etc. While reading this section, I could not help to remember my elderly dog with his arthritic back who always enjoyed lying up against the heater in the evening. The heater was long and low to the floor. I am sure this made him feel very comfortable but it served as an automatic shut-off for my heater. Inevitably he would knock the heater over. Fortunately, we purchased this heater because it had an auto-shutoff feature in the event that it was toppled over. I would recommend folks who use portable heaters to look into this option.
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 1/7/17, 10:10 PM
Jeffrey R. Jonas's Avatar
Jeffrey R. Jonas Jeffrey R. Jonas is online now
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Minnesota & Northern Iowa
Posts: 28,148
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

Quote:
Originally Posted by lkovacs View Post
I have what appears to be a straight, healthy, deciduous magnolia tree. This tree typically grows greater than 40 ft. and sheds leaves all year around. The tree is located approximately 20 ft from the structure. My only recommendation would be to prune the foliage around and over the structure, particularly nearest the chimney primarily for fire protection, since the chimney does not have a cap and spark arrestor. Additionally to prevent leaves from collecting on the rooftop.

Attachment 171236
Isn't that illegal in California?



Jeffrey R. Jonas
Owatonna, Minnesota



"I am not a teacher, but an awakener."
- Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963).


Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 1/8/17, 7:46 PM
Ian W. Mayer's Avatar
Ian W. Mayer Ian W. Mayer is online now
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Posts: 2,978
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjonas View Post
Isn't that illegal in California?
Given how many houses I inspect that don't have them, it's not like any drives around and enforces any such rule.

Although it's impossible to get a permit for a new wood burning fireplace in Los Angeles.
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 1/9/17, 3:27 PM
Jeff L. Gollaher, CMI's Avatar
Jeff L. Gollaher, CMI Jeff L. Gollaher, CMI is offline
Certified Master Inspector
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 136
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

Here is a small tree (Japanese maple) very close to the home. The future issue will be the leaves in the rain gutters. The tree roots aren't a big concern due to the type and size of tree. I wouldn't recommend putting a tree like this any closer to the homes foundation.
Attached Thumbnails
perform-tree-inspections-course-dscf5457.jpg  





Serving the Greater Sacramento Area
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 1/13/17, 4:47 PM
Carl R. Hansen Carl R. Hansen is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 19
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

The White Pine in the foreground is native to the northern tier of the United States from Maine to Minnesota.
It has grown too large for its location and is now overhanging the house.
There is a potential of damage from falling limbs and physical damage to roof will occur by branch/limb movement making contact with the shingles. Debris from tree can accumulate on shingles and promote the growth of moss and lichen, fill the gutter system, and prevent proper shedding of rainwater and snowmelt. Branches over shading roof will delay drying of shingles resulting in diminished lifespan of the roof system, fascia, soffit, and siding. Root pressure can damage the foundation.
In this situation the branches are in contact with the structure, the shingles have a heavy growth of moss, the gutter is filled with pine needles, the wood fascia is decaying, there is possible microbial growth under the soffit, the wood siding is also stained, and the paver brick sidewalk is lifting from root pressure.
In this geographical location the prevailing winds are from the west and the storm winds can be from the west, north or northwest. High wind from any of these directions could topple the tree onto the home.
Attached Thumbnails
perform-tree-inspections-course-dscn4755.jpg  
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 1/13/17, 4:53 PM
Carl R. Hansen Carl R. Hansen is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 19
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

The White Pine in the foreground is native to the northern tier of the United States from Maine to Minnesota.
It has grown too large for its location and is now overhanging the house.
There is a potential of damage from falling limbs and physical damage to roof will occur by branch/limb movement making contact with the shingles. Debris from tree can accumulate on shingles and promote the growth of moss and lichen, fill the gutter system, and prevent proper shedding of rainwater and snowmelt. Branches over shading roof will delay drying of shingles resulting in diminished lifespan of the roof system, fascia, soffit, and siding. Root pressure can damage the foundation.
In this situation the branches are in contact with the structure, the shingles have a heavy growth of moss, the gutter is filled with pine needles, the wood fascia is decaying, there is possible microbial growth under the soffit, the wood siding is also stained, and the paver brick sidewalk is lifting from root pressure.
In this geographical location the prevailing winds are from the west and the storm winds can be from the west, north or northwest. High wind from any of these directions could topple the tree onto the home.
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 1/14/17, 10:03 AM
Carl R. Hansen Carl R. Hansen is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 19
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

Just finished reading "Doing Damage During an Inspection: It's Your Job".
Interesting perspective on who's at fault when you break something that would fail in a short time anyway. Easy to explain to your client, the buyer, but how do you justify it to the seller or realtor? Been down that road before. Also what happens if something is wrecked by a previous inspector, whether it be a pro or an earlier prospective buyer or their Uncle Joe who is a weekend carpenter. Been there too, as I'm sure we all have.
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 1/18/17, 10:38 AM
Eugene M. Pomerleau Eugene M. Pomerleau is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 120
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

So this photo is showing a couple trees across the street from a house I did an inspection at. The biggest reason I mentioned them in my report even though they were not on said property of my inspection was because the enormous size of them which could easily affect the house I was at. With the pile of branches on the ground around them obviously something is going on or was going with them. If you look closely up in the branches you can see many dead limbs and broken limbs dangling as widow makers eventually they will fall. Looking around the base of the trees I really did not see anything alarming to question the health of the trees. I recommended in my report that having these trees examined by a licensed arborist would be a very good idea. Theses being across the street I'm sure was a little more difficult to negotiate.
Attached Thumbnails
perform-tree-inspections-course-image.jpg  
Reply With Quote
Need a home inspection in Hawaii? Check out InterNACHI's listing of Hawaii certified home inspectors. Or, find a home inspector anywhere in the world with our inspection search engine.
  #74  
Old 1/18/17, 11:00 AM
Eugene M. Pomerleau Eugene M. Pomerleau is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 120
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

" Tree Dangers "

Very often trees can add so much to a property in it's appearance. However taking care of trees and observing them on a regular basis can be key to avoid dangers and costly mishaps. Trees planted to close to a house can sometimes affect the foundation and or soil around the foundation from their root system. Branches from trees to close to a house can cause damage with pests gaining access to the house, fire in the tree reaching the house, or perhaps falling branches. Maintaining trees can help avoid issues later on. Cutting and removing of dead trees is an important part of maintaining your property.
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 1/18/17, 11:15 AM
Jeffrey R. Jonas's Avatar
Jeffrey R. Jonas Jeffrey R. Jonas is online now
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Minnesota & Northern Iowa
Posts: 28,148
Default Re: How to Perform Tree Inspections Course

Quote:
Originally Posted by epomerleau View Post
So this photo is showing a couple trees across the street from a house I did an inspection at. The biggest reason I mentioned them in my report even though they were not on said property of my inspection was because the enormous size of them which could easily affect the house I was at. With the pile of branches on the ground around them obviously something is going on or was going with them. If you look closely up in the branches you can see many dead limbs and broken limbs dangling as widow makers eventually they will fall. Looking around the base of the trees I really did not see anything alarming to question the health of the trees. I recommended in my report that having these trees examined by a licensed arborist would be a very good idea. Theses being across the street I'm sure was a little more difficult to negotiate.
See those things called 'power lines'.....?



Jeffrey R. Jonas
Owatonna, Minnesota



"I am not a teacher, but an awakener."
- Robert Frost, American poet (1874-1963).


Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 3:35 PM.
no new posts