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Inspection Education & Training This is a forum for inspectors to discuss their educational experience, the InterNACHI School, and to ask questions of InterNACHI's Education Committee.
This forum is dedicated to the memory of InterNACHI member and educator Gerry Beaumont. Gerry was an avid proponent of education for inspectors and will be sorely missed.

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  #14881  
Old 8/12/17, 12:37 PM
Timothy J. Lugovoy Timothy J. Lugovoy is offline
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Default Re: Home Inspector Code of Ethics Course

Hello My name is Tim Lugovoy. New to InterNACHI and just wanted to introduce myself
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  #14882  
Old 8/12/17, 12:55 PM
Timothy J. Lugovoy Timothy J. Lugovoy is offline
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If the house seller requested that the home inspector was to "go easy" on the roof's condition, one should then explain that they would thoroughly inspect the home in all honesty and accuracy that would benefit both the seller and the buyer. This is to ensure all conditions are made known and accurate per the code of ethics and state law. The home inspector should connect with the seller on an agreement that it is essential to be 100% accurate on all conditions of the roof on said home to ensure a smooth transaction that tends to take place when truth is expressed versus a slightly inaccurate assessment.

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  #14883  
Old 8/12/17, 1:02 PM
Timothy J. Lugovoy Timothy J. Lugovoy is offline
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In the Article labeled: Turn away some consumers, I have learned that in some situations, especially in the beginning, even though you may not want to walk away from an inspection fee sometimes it may be the best result of a potential relationship that could go array. Typically it seems that if the potential client seems to be hard to communicate or work with in the beginning, it will only continue to snowball and become a bigger problem down the line. Which is not something one may want to be involved in and could end up saving money in the long run.

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  #14884  
Old 8/12/17, 1:06 PM
Keron Garraway Keron Garraway is offline
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In this situation, the seller, as we as the inspector are withholding information from the perspective buyer that can possible harm them in the future. The seller wants to close the deal and sell the property and the inspector wants to get paid for the job especially if its a large property; but in the long run this is dangerous practice. The seller may want to hide possible life threatening defects like mold or roof damage and the buyer may have little children that can become sick or hurt. On the other hand the inspector is now on downward spiral of unscrupulous behavior because you lower your level of service for financial gain and this same scenario may arise in the future and who knows what else the inspector may do for financial gains. Both the seller and the inspector are violating InterNACHIs code of ethics and possibly some real estate ethics laws as well not to mention its just morally wrong.

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  #14885  
Old 8/12/17, 1:25 PM
Keron Garraway Keron Garraway is offline
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How to Draft a Bad Contract
Because property inspections can induce or prevent great expenditures, its very important to have a clear description of the scope of work, compensation, parties involved, what is not being done, time, date and all relevant information. A good contract will not leave the client confused or doubtful as to the nature of the inspection because there was a lot of ambiguity throughout out the contract. A client may feel slighted even though the work was done correctly, but because of the wording and layout of the contract the assumption is you as the inspector have something to hide.

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  #14886  
Old 8/12/17, 3:37 PM
Howard R. Parsons, III Howard R. Parsons, III is offline
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A home inspector can't "go easy" on any aspect of an inspection. As an inspector, your integrity is most important. I would kindly, professionally, and politely explain to the seller that while I understand their situation, as a professional I must report what I see in an unbiased way. I would then offer the seller my services for their next home as they would want an inspector who is honest and holds himself to a higher standard.

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  #14887  
Old 8/12/17, 4:23 PM
Henry M. Noyes Henry M. Noyes is offline
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Using the example of a house seller asking a inspector "going easy" on a inspection, I would first explain that the seller asking is unethical and me agreeing is unethical. I then would explain I have a duty to be unbiased and report the true condition of the house and systems. I would also inform the seller I have a ethical duty to report the conversation to the buyer.

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  #14888  
Old 8/12/17, 4:57 PM
Henry M. Noyes Henry M. Noyes is offline
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I chose the article titled "Doing Damage During an Inspection: It's Your Job". I found it odd that breaking something could be a advantage but after reading the article I have a different understand. Putting a foot threw a stair, floor, or roof may identify a larger problem and save the buyer money.

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  #14889  
Old 8/12/17, 5:06 PM
Howard R. Parsons, III Howard R. Parsons, III is offline
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I read the article about avoiding lawsuits as this is an area of concern to me. A lot of the items appear to be common sense but the most advantageous aspect to reading the article was the many forms attached to it by link. The life expectancy brochure is an absolute must for homeowners to read as this alone can prevent most claims against your company. People, out of ignorance, expect that because the house was inspected and a guarantee was provided that their A/C (for example) is covered even though it's 15 years old. These forms are an incredible way to cover your company in the event that a client is unhappy and proceeds with a lawsuit.

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  #14890  
Old 8/12/17, 5:30 PM
Michael F. Williamson, 3550561 Michael F. Williamson, 3550561 is offline
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Situation: Home inspector is asked by the R.E. Broker to fast track an inspection on a home that the home inspector recently inspected by using details from the previous inspection report.

Resolution: Explained to the R.E. Broker privately that forgoing a thorough inspection is not in the best interest of your shared client as homes are not static so there may be something new to report such as recent damage, recent repairs or something that was missed during the previous inspection. Also, explain that information from the previous inspection is owned by the previous client and is not to be shared. Finally, reinforce the SOP that inspectors are bound to and wavering from them would damage the inspectors professional reputation and create an avenue for an ethics complaint. If the R.E. Broker does not agree, explain the same to the client. If the client does not agree, do not accept the inspection.

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  #14891  
Old 8/12/17, 5:55 PM
Andre Benard Andre Benard is offline
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I would inform the seller that i'm here for the buyer and that giving any misleading comment on the roof or any other part of my inspection. Verbally or in writing would be unethical and goes against my better judgement and the NACHI standard of practice.

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  #14892  
Old 8/12/17, 6:04 PM
Andre Benard Andre Benard is offline
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all inspectors should join interNACHI to help avoid lawsuits. Its the world's largest inspection trade association, and its Standards of Practice can be pointed to as definitive for the inspection industry. Substantially abiding by InterNACHI's Standards of Practice provides a strong defense against a claim that you failed to perform to a level of care or acceptable practice for the inspection profession.
Furthermore, InterNACHI's membership requirements are in addition to whatever your local, state or provincial government licensing and regulation may demand. Membership is evidence that you are the type of inspector who voluntarily goes above and beyond the minimum requirements that merely allow you to legally operate in your area.

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  #14893  
Old 8/12/17, 7:57 PM
Jacob Yoffe Jacob Yoffe is online now
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The homeowner left a note on kitchen counter, "dear home inspector, the following issues are known, missing shingle, water heater leaking, cracking in the foundation with signs of water intrusion, etc. and are going to be addressed". Please do not included them in the report. When the speaking with the client(s), I inform them of the note and explain that I'm here for the client(s) and I will note the issues with the home as they stand today. I not let what the homeowner or anyone else say sway issues that are found during the inspection. I would give the note to the clients for there keeping. I would recommend that if issues are fixed and i would recommend to request any documentation of the repairs and person/company was a qualified to make the repairs.

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  #14894  
Old 8/12/17, 8:07 PM
Stratton Brown Stratton Brown is offline
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The home inspector should inspect every house or unit or building all the same regardless if they know the person buying or selling the property. The inspector has to abide by the code of ethics that have been provided by Internachi

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  #14895  
Old 8/12/17, 8:32 PM
Stratton Brown Stratton Brown is offline
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In order to become a certified 203K advisor you have to be a certified home inspector or contractor for a minimum of 3 years! A state certification as architect or engineer will do instead as well. If you want to be a advisor in a state that requires a state certification for a home inspector you would need that state license.

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