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Inspection Education & Training This is a forum for inspectors to discuss their educational experience, the InterNACHI School, and to ask questions of InterNACHI's Education Committee.
This forum is dedicated to the memory of InterNACHI member and educator Gerry Beaumont. Gerry was an avid proponent of education for inspectors and will be sorely missed.

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  #11011  
Old 2/13/18, 1:06 AM
Philip Knopp Philip Knopp is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 20
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Here are some safety cones I found that are both convenient and functional. These cones are light weight for carrying around, fold up to be compact, so they are easy to put in with your tools. In addition to the bright orange, they have a light in the base and reflective stripe that increases the visibility even within a home and draw attention to their presence.

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  #11012  
Old 2/13/18, 9:57 AM
Donald Lickley Donald Lickley is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 12
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this is your basic electrical tester. this tester is used to detect common defects. you plug the tester into a receptacle the three color lights will indicate various defects such as an open ground, an open neutral, an open hot, hot and ground reverse, hot and neutral reverse or correct wiring. it is also used to test a GFCI receptacle by pushing the red button on top the GFCI should trip.

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  #11013  
Old 2/13/18, 10:49 AM
Isidro Rioseco Isidro Rioseco is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 22
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This image shows a wood attic drop-down ladder in poor condition. As seen in the image there is a major split of the wood rail on the top articulating section of the ladder at the joint with the mid articulating section. This condition present a safety hazard to any user, not just to the home inspector, since the underneath bracing at this joint is no longer effective in preventing lateral restraint and could result in separation of the articulating sections. I would advice the client to not use the ladder and to have a professional carpenter replace it. the ladder

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  #11014  
Old 2/13/18, 11:44 AM
Isidro Rioseco Isidro Rioseco is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 22
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I chose the article on GFCI from the NACHI library.
This article describes the principle of operation of the two different types of CGFI typically found in homes (receptacle and circuit breaker) and how to test them. I learned that it is important for the home owner to recognize where these devices are installed throughout their home and to regularly test them to ensure they are serving their intended function of protecting occupants against potential electrical shorts.

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  #11015  
Old 2/13/18, 2:00 PM
Mark Navarro Mark Navarro is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Mount Juliet Tennessee
Posts: 16
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Crawlspace hazards; always make sure someone knows you are entering a crawlspace in case you become trapped or injured also I highly recommend to wear all PP gear due to the airborne pathogens, pests, improper wiring(electrocution) and sewage contamination. Upon exiting a crawlspace it is highly recommended wash your hands and face. Inspectors should evaluate crawlspaces for safety, if you do not feel it is safe do not inspect until hazards have been corrected

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  #11016  
Old 2/13/18, 3:37 PM
Nicholas Love Nicholas Love is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 29
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Photo is of a basic first aid kit. This is a piece of equipment that should be placed at the very least in your vehicle if not tool bag. If an injury were to occur it is best to always be prepared.

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  #11017  
Old 2/13/18, 3:49 PM
Nicholas Love Nicholas Love is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 29
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Searche engine optimization tips is the article I looked at. The main thing that I learned from this article is that there are many different ways to optimize search engine traffic to your personal business website. InterNACHI has done a lot of the ground work for us all we need to do is use it.

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  #11018  
Old 2/13/18, 5:23 PM
Jordin Barth Jordin Barth is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 2
Please Note: jbarth is a non-member guest and is in no way affiliated with InterNACHI or its members.
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Furnace Inspection: I performed a visual inspection of the heating system and found the front cover had already been removed, the motor was not connected and was resting on the floor in front of the furnace. There was also low lighting and other potential hazards in the vicinity of the area. These are stop-work conditions, so I advise that the heating system be repaired and certified by a certified HVAC contractor before a inspection can be completed. I verbally communicated my recommendation to the home owner, snapped a picture of the furnace, and erected a orange danger sign with the warning not to operate until it has been certified by a HVAC contractor.

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  #11019  
Old 2/13/18, 6:06 PM
Jay Hunter Jay Hunter is offline
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Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 26
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This is a picture of a half-face respirator, it is used for multiple purposes. The filters that are attached are good for sanding Chromium Hexavalent and Phenolic and also working with MEK and MPK. You can easily change out the filters to accomplish the task you are involved in.

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  #11020  
Old 2/13/18, 6:17 PM
Jay Hunter Jay Hunter is offline
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Posts: 26
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In the article "Commercial and Home Inspector Safety: Carcinogens on the Job" it talks about several different known Carcinogens and that you need to know what to look for or smell for. Always wear the proper PPE, which could include, Tyvek coverall, gloves, rubber boots, and your respirator.

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  #11021  
Old 2/13/18, 6:20 PM
Miguel Ortiz Miguel Ortiz is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1
Default Re: 'Safe Practices for Home Inspectors' Course

hello support team, here we go !!!
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  #11022  
Old 2/13/18, 8:49 PM
Bruce Gagnon Bruce Gagnon is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 15
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I have learned so much about attic inspections and it all starts at the access. Attics should only be entered if safe to do so. If an inspector does not enter the attic he/she must not it in the report and state why. Examples could be no access, hazardous conditions, etc. The inspector should select the proper and safe ladder to at least view what he/she can from the access point and take copious notes and photos.

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  #11023  
Old 2/13/18, 8:58 PM
Bruce Gagnon Bruce Gagnon is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 15
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Toilet Inspections

This articles gives a very basic explaination of how a toilet works and explains different types of toilets. Over the years toilets have become more efficient and new law only allows foe 1.6 gallons to be used per flush.

The article also goes into which components to inspect and how to inspect them. It was good to read because I learned the die tablet trick to look for leaks.

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  #11024  
Old 2/13/18, 9:58 PM
Brandon Hutchison Brandon Hutchison is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 10
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I looked at my built in ladder for access to the attic above the garage. The ladder was broken. This damage existed as long as I owned the home, however I did forget about it. The inspection report mentioned unable to get access to the attic above the garage due to a car being parked there. A reminder about moving vehicles in a garage may be something I should consider recommending to a client/agent beforehand.

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  #11025  
Old 2/13/18, 10:13 PM
Brandon Hutchison Brandon Hutchison is offline
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Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 10
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Adjustable Steel Columns
by Nick Gromicko and Kenton Shepard

I read the article about adjustable steel columns. In the area I live, it is very common for basements to be supported by these poles rather than a structural I beam. The article mentions that more than 3 inches of exposed thread and I was not aware this could be a sign of a defect. I also did not now they are required to be connected both to the floor and beam. I will pay close attention to these as I encounter them.

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