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  #9256  
Old 11/15/17, 12:41 AM
Matthew Snyder Matthew Snyder is offline
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Posts: 7
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Photo taken was the flueof a pre-manufactured fireplace. Found a representative amount of creosote built-up on the chimney throat and damper. This build-up could cause dangerous chimney fire. I would recommend this fireplace and chimney be further inspected by a professional chimney sweeper.

Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course
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  #9257  
Old 11/20/17, 3:24 AM
Christopher Vella Christopher Vella is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI)
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 11
Default Re: Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course

looking forward to learning more about chimneys.
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  #9258  
Old 12/6/17, 12:12 AM
Edwin Munoz Edwin Munoz is offline
Certified Professional Inspector (CPI) ®
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Liberty Twp, Ohio
Posts: 8
Thumbs up Re: Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course

Hello everyone;
Just checking in for the first time really and getting ready to learn how to inspect some appliances. I've completed quite a few courses already and anxious to knock this one out of the park as well. If I have any questions I know where to go for help.



Delight yourself in the Lord, and He will give you the desires of your heart.
Psalms 37:4

Deleitate asimismo en Jehova, Y El te concedera las peticiones de tu corazon.
Salmos 37:4
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  #9259  
Old 12/7/17, 7:10 PM
Matthew S. Wolfe Matthew S. Wolfe is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 50
Default Re: Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course

Starting the Fireplaces, Stoves, and Chimneys course. I can see the finish line now!
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  #9260  
Old 12/13/17, 4:52 PM
Colton Kerr Colton Kerr is offline
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I read the article on chimney inspection. The article briefly describes why inspecting the chimney is crucial. The article really puts the dangers of a faulty chimney into perspective. For example how a large chimney in India collapsed killing about 100 workers. I understand it tis important to make sure the chimneys are up to standards and the morter and brick need to be in ideal condition along with proper fasteners to prevent collapse.

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  #9261  
Old 12/13/17, 5:24 PM
Colton Kerr Colton Kerr is offline
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Had to share this fireplace, because I thought it was a little unique. At first glance most might assume it is a wood burning, however it is in-fact a gas aftermarket fireplace. Too be honest I am not sure what the regulations on these types are. Everything operated properly and had sufficient ventilation, but I am not sure where it was ventilating to. There was no exterior wall ventilation, so if I had to guess it connected to the upstairs fireplace vents.

Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course
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  #9262  
Old 12/13/17, 6:12 PM
Jeffrey H. Lublang Jeffrey H. Lublang is offline
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This is a stone/masonry built fireplace. Air is taken in from the room for combustion, heated and the harmful bi-products are vented up the chimney to the outside. Some creosote build up was observed on the fireplace wall, and in the flue. This can result in a fire hazard. We recommend further evaluation and cleaning by a licensed chimney company for safety.

Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course
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  #9263  
Old 12/13/17, 6:16 PM
Tom Adams, HI 2168 Tom Adams, HI 2168 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 2
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Evaluation of unvented gas log sets needs to be accompanied with a disclaimer in the home inspection report alerting your clients to the potential hazards of this type of appliance. I have inspected many of these that we're not operating properly (e.g. produced noxious odors, excessive levels of carbon monoxide, loaded with dirt and dust causing problems, misplaced logs, and improper gas piping setups, etc.) and we're just not safe to use. Don't assume that the homeowner will exercise caution when using these. Use precautionary statements concerning these to protect your client and to protect yourself against any potential liability if you are going to evaluate the operation of these.

Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course
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  #9264  
Old 12/13/17, 6:26 PM
Jeffrey H. Lublang Jeffrey H. Lublang is offline
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When inspecting a chimney looks for a variety of possible defects. These can include missing mortar, the chimney pulling away from the house, cracks around the flashing, chimney caps in place, and spark arrestor in place. Depending on the defect they can result in water leaks, and damage such as falling debris, or to the severe as a fire hazard, or carbon monoxide entering the living space.

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  #9265  
Old 12/13/17, 6:48 PM
Tom Adams, HI 2168 Tom Adams, HI 2168 is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 2
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I read the article on "Attic Pull Down Ladders". I agreed with all that I read concerning improper installation and problems with improper length of the ladders (too long or too short), missing hardware, damaged steps, etc. I might add that a precautionary statement in your report on the use of these might serve your client well and save you from liability when they hurt themselves because of the poor condition of the unit, or wind up in the ER because they did not pay attention to the maximum usage weight. After reading the article I am going to right a disclaimer on the use of these and put it in every report of homes that have these installed.

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  #9266  
Old 12/13/17, 7:43 PM
Ryan Broadstone Ryan Broadstone is offline
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This is a picture of a fireplace that I inspected. It has an electric insert, so all of the venting issues would not apply. Also, the exterior is covered with steel siding so it would be difficult to asses the integrity of the structure. From the picture, the other clearances are easy to inspected and affirm. The combustable mantle is over 12 inches away from the top of the fireplace opening. The hearth is 16 inches and over 8 inches to each side of the opening. The hearth is made of concrete with a brick veneer. There are no cracks or failing mortar joints.

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  #9267  
Old 12/13/17, 7:51 PM
Ryan Broadstone Ryan Broadstone is offline
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I read an article on factory built fireplaces. These are very common in newer homes and in my area. First, they are very reliable and their design has had a lot of testing before being put into production. As an inspector, many of the same key areas need to be inspected. Proper venting, rain caps, chase covers, spark arrestors, etc need to be inspected. The other important thing to look for will be clearances between the structure and other combustables. The chimney needs at least 2 inches clearance and a fire stop. One of the main advantages, after construction cost, is the fact that the whole structure is not masonry. Where masonry structures need there own footing and are a stand alone structure, factory built fireplaces can be built within the existing structure design.

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  #9268  
Old 12/13/17, 8:31 PM
Daniel T. Smart Daniel T. Smart is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Location: Bangor, ME
Posts: 13
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Condition of chimney and flue: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Chimney type: Masonry, with terracotta liner (not in use at the time of the inspection)

29) Repair & Maintain, Evaluate - The masonry chimney was not in use at the time of the inspection. Based on the visible condition, you may consider evaluation for repair by a qualified chimney professional if usage is desired.

* The chimney crown was worn/cracked that can contribute to water accumulation and damage to the masonry and/or terracotta liner.

* No spark screen or rain cap was installed to prevent debris/water/pest entry through the liner that can contribute to moisture damage/deterioration.

* The ash cleanout cover was not properly secured and was on the floor at the time of the review. Conditioned air from the basement is likely to be drawn through the chimney to the exterior of the home resulting in higher heating costs. This is especially true as the chimney was heated on one side because of the metal duct that extends to the second floor off the heating system to provide forced air heat to the bedroom(s). Updating the chimney to include a metal flashing secured with metal fasteners and a fire-rated caulking to seal the chimney chase would improve efficiency and safety and should be considered as time and budget allows.

Chimney professionals for your consideration:

Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course
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  #9269  
Old 12/13/17, 8:33 PM
Daniel T. Smart Daniel T. Smart is offline
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Join Date: May 2007
Location: Bangor, ME
Posts: 13
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I reviewed information regarding ventless heaters. I find them frequently here in Maine and always provide the applicable information including the fuel, model, serial and manual if I can locate it online.

From the class:

Manufacturers report that they burn at nearly 100% efficiency releasing fewer harmful gases into the home than other types of fireplaces. However, because they are ventless, any unburned combustion byproducts are released directly into the living space because there is no chimney to vent them out of the home. Also because no air intake is installed, many manufacturers recommend that homeowners open a window during operation of the fireplace, although there is no way to guarantee homeowners will follow this advice. A ventless fireplace that is burning efficiently will have a primarily blue flame. Defects such as plugged burner ports, a cracked burner, excessive gas input, impurities in the gas, or a gas leak somewhere in the unit can impact performance, reducing the efficiency of the burn and increasing the amount of combustion byproducts released.

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  #9270  
Old 12/13/17, 9:09 PM
Jim stallings Jim stallings is offline
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Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 3
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When you are inspecting a flue pipe being inserted in to a chimney. You want to make sure it isnt installed to far into the chimney, if it is it could cause improper venting and allow gases to enter back into the house

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