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  #9286  
Old 12/14/17, 5:47 PM
Kevin Merk Kevin Merk is offline
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This concrete chimney cap is deteriorating along with mortar deterioration between the bricks. These items may allow for moisture intrusion into the home. Recommend further inspection and repair as needed by a professional mason. This is a defect and must be addressed.

Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course
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  #9287  
Old 12/14/17, 5:51 PM
Kevin Merk Kevin Merk is offline
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Kick out diverter flashing: A kick out diverter flashing should be installed at the end of the roof slope (bottom step flashing) where the roof and wall meet to divert water away from the side wall and into the gutter.

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  #9288  
Old 12/14/17, 6:42 PM
James Culbert James Culbert is offline
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You can see from the picture of the attached fireplace that even though the mantle is a proper distance from the hearth there is signs of smoke discoloration. This is a sign of bad drafting in the chimney. This should be further inspected by a qualified professional.

Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course
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  #9289  
Old 12/14/17, 6:45 PM
James Culbert James Culbert is offline
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I read the article on chimney inspection and preventing collapse. Most people don't understand the danger risk associated with not having a structurally sound and properly attached chimney. It is an important part of every inspection to do a thorough visual inspection of the chimney make up, footings and how they are attached to the structure if these inspections are possible.

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  #9290  
Old 12/14/17, 6:55 PM
Hasan Hatten Hasan Hatten is offline
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This is a photo of brick masonry wall that has a widespread of efflorescence. Efflorescence is when water enters brick work and the salt deposits are pulled out leaving a white powdery substance. This could be considered a defect because this much efflorescence could cause the wall to fail, if not rectified as soon as possible.

Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course
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  #9291  
Old 12/14/17, 7:00 PM
Hasan Hatten Hasan Hatten is offline
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I viewed the gallery on flashing around chimneys. Each and every chimney should have counter flashing and step flashing. The flashing should not be one piece, but 2 because one is pointed into the mortar joints in the chimney stack and the other onto the roof. Since the house and chimney each have individual footings separate from each other they settle at different rates. A single piece of flashing would tear because of the different rates of settlement.

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  #9292  
Old 12/14/17, 7:42 PM
Derek Cameron Derek Cameron is offline
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I read an article about chimney inspections. I learned that chimneys should be inspected for mortar that is crumbling between the bricks, missing lateral support, mechincal damage to to chimney, visable tilting or separation from the building. In summary inspections are needed to provent expensive collipase.

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  #9293  
Old 12/14/17, 9:19 PM
Erin K. Brown Erin K. Brown is offline
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The inspector noted significant interior cracking and deterioration to the wall of the firebox itself - recommended that a licensed contractor correct prior to use. The inspector noted that the manually operated damper did not operate or close properly. Additionally the inspector noted a cleanout door that was obstructed or did not close tightly.

Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course
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  #9294  
Old 12/14/17, 11:50 PM
David King David King is online now
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Default Re: Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course

Here is a picture of an older chimney that is showing high levels or wear. One thing of note is that the flashing is showing corrosion, and in addition a cricket may need to be installed to aid in drainage. Recommend evaluation by a qualified roofer.
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  #9295  
Old 12/14/17, 11:51 PM
David King David King is online now
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Default Re: Student discussions of "How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves, & Chimneys" course

In the article "cool" energy efficient roofs, I discovered that there exists a type of roof known as a "cool" roof. This type of roof has strong reflective properties which allow the roof to deflect much of the heat from the sun.
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  #9296  
Old 12/15/17, 12:45 AM
Daniel Meier Daniel Meier is offline
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The Fireplace was made of masonry and is Wood burning.
The hearth extension was adequate and the mantel was secure.
Damper is in good condition and operable.
I recommend having the flu cleaned and reexamined by a professional before use.

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  #9297  
Old 12/15/17, 12:51 AM
Daniel Meier Daniel Meier is offline
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Landscape shading is one of the best cost efficient ways of cutting down on unwanted solar heating. Unobstructed solar heat can significantly increase indoor air temperature. However, appropriate tree placement can reduce indoor temperatures by up to 9 F(12 C). Dense evergreen trees and shrubs will provide continuous shade and block heavy winds. Deciduous trees can be used to block solar heat in the summer while they let much of it in during the winter. To effectively employ landscape shading, you must plan out the location, size and shape of the shadows cast by your trees

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