Job Task Analysis (JTA) for the Home Inspector

 
 

Introduction

InterNACHI's Home Inspector Job Task Analysis is intended to list all of the tasks a home inspector may perform, as well as the knowledge, abilities, and skills required to do these tasks. 
 
A job task analysis is a foundation for any valid credentialing program and helps identify the core knowledge areas, critical work functions, and skills typically found across a representative sampling of current practitioners or job incumbent workers. Empirical results from a job analysis provide examinees and the public with a valid, reliable, fair, and realistic assessment that reflects the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to competently perform a job.
 
In 2010, a committee considered to be subject matter experts in the field of home inspections met at InterNACHI Headquarters in Boulder, Colorado, to develop the Home Inspector Job Task Analysis and to create an examination blueprint that would serve as the basis for the inspector certification.

 
InterNACHI's Home Inspector Job Task Analysis (JTA) catalogs the key tasks an inspector performs to complete a given job and the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSA) the inspector should possess to perform those tasks adequately. Knowledge is the practical understanding of a subject. A skill combines an ability with acquired knowledge that allows an individual to complete a task to a high standard. Skills are learned and are aimed at achieving a goal.
InterNACHI uses the JTA and KSA to develop and administrate curricula and course content for training and assessment purposes. This analysis is also fundamental to the development, structure and administration of InterNACHI's Home Inspector Certificate Program.
 
 
 

Scope

A home inspector is a certified professional who performs home inspections and writes home inspection reports. A home inspection is a non-invasive, visual examination of the readily accessible areas of a residential property, performed for a fee, which is designed to identify defects within specific systems and components that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector. The scope of work may be modified by the Client and Inspector prior to the inspection process.
 
  • The home inspection is based on the observations made on the date of the inspection, and not a prediction of future conditions.
  • The home inspection will not reveal every issue that exists or ever could exist, but only those material defects observed on the date of the inspection.
 
A material defect is a condition of a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk to people.  The fact that a system or component is near, at or beyond the end of its normal useful life is not, in itself, a material defect.
 
A home inspection report shall identify, in written format, defects within specific systems and components defined by a Standards of Practice that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector. Inspection reports may include additional comments and recommendations.
 
 

Job Description

A Home Inspector performs a standardized, non-diagnostic inspection of a residential property performed according to the International Standards of Practice for Performing a General Home Inspection. A home inspection is a non-invasive, visual examination of the accessible areas of a residential property, performed for a fee, which is designed to identify defects within specific systems and components that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector.

 
 
 

Course Descriptions and Learning Outcomes

InterNACHI School uses the term "goal" is a broad definition of competence.  We use "objective" to describe in general terms what a graduate will be able to do, and they are more broad than measurable performance outcomes.  We define "measurable performance outcomes" as a detailed list of the Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSA) a student will attain. 
 
For every InterNACHI School course description page (syllabus), the KSA are listed under "You will learn the following."  The KSA are mapped directly back to the InterNACHI Home Inspector Job Task Analysis (JTA) which lists all of the tasks an inspector may perform, as well as the knowledge, abilities, and skills required to do these tasks.  
 

 
 
 
 

Domains and Tasks

DOMAIN 1: COLLECT HOME DATA. 
  • Task 1: Conduct a visual inspection.
  • Task 2: Collect health and safety data.
  • Task 3: Collect roof data.
  • Task 4: Collect exterior data.
  • Task 5: Collect foundation data.
  • Task 6: Collect heating, ventilation and air condition (HVAC) system data.
  • Task 7: Collect electrical data.
  • Task 8: Collect plumbing data.
  • Task 9: Collect attic, ventilation, and insulation data.
  • Task 10: Collect wall, ceiling, floor, and interior data.
  • Task 11: Collect window data.
  • Task 12: Collect door data.
  • Task 13: Collect garage data.
DOMAIN 2: EVALUATE COLLECTED DATA.
  • Task 1: Evaluate the observations from a visual inspection.
  • Task 2: Evaluate health and safety data.
  • Task 3: Evaluate roof data.
  • Task 4: Evaluate exterior data.
  • Task 5: Evaluate foundation data.
  • Task 6: Evaluate HVAC data.
  • Task 7: Evaluate electrical data.
  • Task 8: Evaluate plumbing data.
  • Task 9: Evaluate attic, ventilation, and insulation data.
  • Task 10: Evaluate wall, ceiling, floor, and interior data.
  • Task 11: Evaluate window data.
  • Task 12: Evaluate door data.
  • Task 13: Evaluate garage data.
DOMAIN 3: COMMUNICATE DATA.
  • Task 1: Enter data into reporting software or checklist.
  • Task 2: Identify defects in writing.
  • Task 3: Communicate, in writing, the need for correcting defects.
 

 
 
 

DOMAIN 1: COLLECT HOME DATA.

 
Task 1: Conduct a visual inspection.
This task of conducting a visual inspection is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the following: Code of Ethics CourseResidential Standards of Practice CourseSafe Practices for the Home Inspector Course25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know CourseResidential Plumbing Overview for Inspectors CourseHow to Perform Residential Electrical Inspections CourseHow to Perform Roof Inspections CourseHow to Inspect HVAC Systems CourseStructural Issues for Home Inspectors CourseHow to Inspect the Exterior CourseHow to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior CourseHow to Perform Deck Inspections CourseHow to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion CourseHow to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves and Chimneys Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

Knowledge of:
  • Standards of Practice for Performing a General Home Inspection
  • General building construction and techniques
  • Building materials
  • Systems and components
  • Appliances and equipment
  • Combustion appliance venting
  • Standards 
  • Common installation best practices
  • Common defects
  • Common indications of defects
  • How systems function
  • How components fail
  • How to maintain a residential property
  • Hazardous materials
  • Issues that pose a health and/or safety risk
  • Digital photography and videography
  • Documentation
Ability to:
  • Inspect the systems and components of the building in accordance with the Home Inspection Standards of Practice
  • Carry and use ladders 
  • Use checklists
  • Follow inspection procedures
  • Use digital cameras and common inspection tools
  • Walk the exterior and interior of the building
  • Access and inspect unfinished spaces
  • Address the concerns of the client
  • Identify system and components
  • Identify common defects
  • Identify structural, health and safety issues
  • Describe the type of roof-covering materials
  • Describe the type of exterior wall-covering materials
  • Measure spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails
  • Describe the type of foundation
  • Describe the location of the access to the under-floor space
  • Describe the location of the thermostat for the heating and cooling system
  • Describe the heating system's energy source
  • Describe the heating and cooling method
  • Describe whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence
  • Describe the location of the main water supply shut-off valve
  • Describe the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve
  • Describe the location of any observed fuel-storage system
  • Describe the capacity of the water heating equipment
  • Describe the main service disconnect's amperage rating
  • Describe the type of wiring observed
  • Describe the type of fireplace
  • Describe the type of insulation observed
  • Describe the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure
  • Describe a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener
  • Making detailed descriptions
  • Estimating age, size and distance
  • Listen to others
Skill in:
  • Managing time
  • Planning the method of performing an inspection
  • Observation
  • Attention to detail
  • Moving through a home, including unfinished spaces
  • Finding defects
  • Verifying the truth, condition, or presence of something
  • Hypothesizing the cause of a condition
 
 
Task 2: Collect health and safety data.
This task of collecting health and safety data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the Safe Practices for the Home Inspector Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
 
Knowledge of:
  • Proper locations for smoke/CO detectors
  • Venting requirements for appliances
  • Conditions that signify moisture
  • Domestic water heater safety
  • Electrical hazards
  • Hazardous materials
  • Heating system safety
  • How to determine if knob-and-tube wiring is active
  • Issues and hazards associated with asbestos
  • Issues and hazards associated with lead-based paint
  • Rules and regulations pertaining to lead and asbestos
  • Smoke/CO detector operation
  • Inspector liability
  • Apparel for safety
  • Personal protection equipment (PPE)
  • Inspection signage
  • Avoiding common back injuries
  • Ladder operation and safety
  • Confined spaces
  • Hydroponics and marijuana grow operations
  • Meth labs
  • Post-disaster inspections
  • Arthropods and snakes
Ability to:
  • Locate existing smoke/carbon monoxide (CO) detectors
  • Estimate the age of smoke/CO detectors
  • Determine if smoke detectors/CO are hard-wired or battery-operated
  • Verify that clothes dryer is vented to the exterior
  • Verify that exhaust fans are vented to the exterior
  • Identify the existence of hazardous materials or conditions
  • Identify knob-and-tube wiring
  • Identify moisture issues (standing water, condensation, plumbing leaks, mold, etc)
  • Identify electrical hazards (frayed wiring, open junction boxes, unkempt wires, overloaded circuits, etc.)
  • Identify suspected asbestos
  • Identify lead-based paint hazards
  • Identify propane-fueled appliances
  • Identify unvented combustion appliances
  • Identify improperly operating backdraft damper
  • Inspect after an emergency
  • Operating a ladder
Skill in:
  • Working safely
  • Using a ladder safely
  • Protecting oneself
 
 
Task 3: Collect roof data.
This task of collecting roof data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Perform Roof Inspections Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
 
Knowledge of:
  • Common roof terms
  • General roof terms
  • Roof styles and details
  • Common roof issues
  • Gutters and drainage
  • Roof drainage and gutters
  • Downspout terminations
  • Framing and trim
  • Roof framing from outside
  • Roofing trim
  • Roof coverings
  • Asphalt shingles
  • Slate tile roofing
  • Clay and concrete tile
  • Asbestos cement tiles
  • Wood shingle and shakes
  • Flat roofs: roll roofing
  • Flat roofs: built-up
  • Flat roofs: membranes
  • Metal roofing
  • Roofing oddities
  • Roof flashings
  • Edge and ridge flashings
  • Valley flashings
  • Roof-to-roof flashings
  • Roof-to-wall flashings
  • Chimney flashings
  • Vents and other penetrations
  • Roof ventilation
  • Basic ventilation
  • Inspecting chimneys
  • Masonry chimneys
  • Manufactured chimneys
Ability to:
  • Inspect the roof system and components
  • Identify roof conditions
  • Identify roof color
  • Identify roof-covering materials
  • Inspect roof penetrations
  • Inspect roof ventilation
  • Identify roof debris
  • Identify roof drainage
  • Inspect the gutters
  • Inspect the downspouts
  • Estimate roof slope
  • Inspect flashing
  • Identify roof access
  • Identify roof exposure and orientation
  • Identify roof insulation
  • Inspect roof skylights
  • Inspect chimneys
  • Work at heights
  • Inspect the general structure of the roof
  • Describe the type of roof-covering materials
Skill in:
  • Attention to detail
  • Making many observations
  • Recognizing anomalies and patterns 
  • Measuring
  • Finding defects
  • Finding indications of active roof leaks
 
 
Task 4: Collect exterior data.
This task of collecting exterior data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Exterior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
 
 
Knowledge of:
  • Construction of exterior wall-covering materials
  • Installation methods and practices
  • Inspector safety requirements
  • Insulation value of siding
  • Solid wood and lumber siding
  • Plywood siding
  • Shingles and shakes
  • Hardboard
  • oriented strand board (OSB) siding
  • Particleboard siding
  • Finish problems
  • Chalking
  • Rot
  • Aluminum and steel siding
  • Grounding metal siding
  • Vinyl siding
  • Structural insulated panels (SIPs)
  • Brick
  • Stone
  • Stucco and exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS)
  • Asbestos cement-based siding
  • Clay and slate shingles
  • Asphalt shingles
  • Masonry exterior wall covering
  • Concrete blocks
  • Manufactured stone
  • Load-bearing or veneer
  • Common problems with masonry exteriors
  • Foundation cracks and water
  • Masonry foundation and piers
  • Shrinkage cracking
  • Sweeping or horizontal cracking
  • Above-ground masonry walls
  • Eaves, soffits and fascia
  • Wall assemblies
  • Housewrap
  • Waterproofing and damp-proofing
  • Permanent wood foundations
  • Common problems with walls
  • Inadequate clearance from the roof cover
  • Dense vegetation
  • Wood and soil contact
  • Water intrusion
  • Flashing
  • Caulking
  • Sealants for through-wall penetrations
  • Kickout flashing
  • Exterior drainage systems
  • Site surface drainage
  • Foundation drainage
  • Roof and surface drainage
  • Roof overhangs and projections
  • Roof drainage, gutters and downspouts
  • Property drainage
  • Sump pumps
  • Landscaping
  • Fences
  • Windows and doors
  • Windowsills and door sills
  • Windowsill height
  • Putty
  • Weatherstripping
  • Shutters
  • Awnings
  • Fogged windows
  • Egress doors
  • Ramps
  • Stairways
  • Risers and treads
  • Guards and spheres
  • Handgrips
  • Attachment
  • Emergency escape and rescue openings
  • Window wells
  • Basement walkouts
  • Exterior decks
  • Garage structures
  • Garage door opener inspection procedures
  • Chimneys
  • Defensible space
  • Retaining walls
  • Driveway, walkways and pavements
  • Buried oil tanks
  • Yards and courts
  • Flood zones
  • Exterior water
  • GFCI-protection for the exterior
  • Clothes dryer exhaust
  • Private wells
  • Septic systems
  • Water management and water damage prevention
  • Doorbells and chimes
  • Lawn and garden sprinkler systems
  • Pool, spa and hot tubs
  • Outbuildings
  • Outdoor cooking equipment
  • Gas supply systems
  • Private water wells
  • Private septic systems
  • Whole-house/central vacuum systems
Ability to:
  • Inspect the exterior system and components
  • Identify exterior conditions
  • Identify exterior wall-covering materials
  • Inspect exterior wall-covering materials
  • Describe exterior wall-covering materials
  • Inspect flashing and trim
  • Inspect exterior doors
  • Inspect walkways and driveways
  • Inspect stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps
  • Identify flashing color
  • Inspect porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports
  • Inspect railings, guards and handrails
  • Identify improper spacing at railings and guards
  • Identify the eaves, soffits and fascia
  • Inspect the eaves, soffits and fascia
  • Inspect windows
  • Inspect vegetation
  • Inspect surface drainage
  • Inspect retaining walls
  • Inspect grading of the property
  • Identify wood in contact with or near soil
Skill in:
  • Attention to detail
  • Making many observations
  • Recognizing anomalies and patterns 
  • Finding defects
 
 
Task 5: Collect foundation data.
This task of collecting foundation data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the Structural Issues for Home Inspectors Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

Knowledge of:
  • Foundation types
  • Common structural terms
  • General construction
  • What to look for outside
  • What to look for inside
  • Ground and lot of property
  • Common framing
  • Foundation construction materials and methods
  • Basic electricity
  • Basic plumbing
  • Building science
  • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
  • Crawlspace ventilation
  • Inspector safety
  • Potential sources of moisture
  • Indications of moisture
  • Indications of pests/vermin
  • Indications of structural hazards
Ability to:
  • Identify foundation types
  • Describe foundation types
  • Identify foundation materials
  • Inspect the foundation, basement, crawlspace and structural components
  • Identify cutting, notching, and boring of structural components
  • Measure floor areas
  • Identify air-infiltration points
  • Identify moisture-intrusion points
  • Identify indications of moisture intrusion
  • Identify the location of access
  • Identify electrical hazards
  • Identify indications of pest/vermin infestations
  • Identify special equipment 
  • Identify crawlspace ventilation
  • Work in confined spaces
  • Identify wood in contact with or near soil
  • Measure
  • Identify indications of possible foundation movement
  • Identify safety concerns
Skill in:
  • Making many observations
  • Attention to detail
  • Finding indications of structural defects
  • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
 
 
Task 6: Collect HVAC data.
This task of collecting HVAC data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect HVAC Systems Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves and Chimneys Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
 
Knowledge of:
  • Building science
  • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
  • Heat fundamentals
  • Heating system types
  • Warm-air heating systems
  • Different controls and motors
  • Ventilation system types
  • Types of ventilation materials
  • Ventilation ductwork
  • Fuel types
  • Combustion process
  • Gas, gas meters, and gas pipes
  • Furnace fundamentals
  • Ducts
  • Gas furnaces
  • Oil furnaces
  • High-efficiency heat exchangers
  • Coal, wood, and multi-fuel furnaces
  • Hydronic heating systems
  • Steam heating systems
  • Electric heating systems
  • Steam and hot-water space heating systems
  • Fuel-fired versus electric heating systems
  • Cooling system types
  • Heating methods
  • Cooling methods
  • Air conditioning
  • Heat pumps
  • Air cleaners and filters
  • Humidifiers
  • Electric furnaces
  • Indoor air quality
  • Basic duct installation
  • Determine the condition of ventilation ductwork
  • Crawlspace ventilation
  • Indications of condensation problems
Ability to:
  • Identify heating system types
  • Identify cooling system types
  • Identify ventilation system types
  • Inspect heating, cooling, and ventilation systems
  • Use normal operating controls
  • Describe the location of the operating controls
  • Identify energy sources
  • Identify the heating method
  • Identify systems that do not operate
  • Identify systems that are not accessible
  • Identify air filtering types
  • Identify humidification systems
  • Describe the method of controlling condensation
  • Identify condensation problems
  • Identify special equipment 
  • Work in confined spaces
  • Measure
  • Identify safety concerns
  • Identify the heat source in occupied living spaces
  • Inspecting ductwork condition
  • Identify properly operating backdraft damper
  • Identify unvented combustion appliances
  • Confirm that the clothes dryer is properly vented to the exterior
  • Confirm that all exhaust fans are properly vented to the exterior
Skill in:
  • Making many observations
  • Using inspection tools
  • Inspection and maintenance procedures
  • Determining defects
  • Attention to detail
  • Finding defects
  • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
 

Task 7: Collect electrical data.
This task of collecting electrical data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Perform Residential Electrical Inspections Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
 
Knowledge of:
  • How electricity works
  • Electrical components in a home
  • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
  • Arcing
  • Electrical hazards
  • Common electrical wiring defects
  • Common electrical terminology
  • Simple electrical theory
  • Conductor sizes
  • Service entrance
  • Service drops
  • Service masts
  • Service laterals
  • Electric meters
  • Service entrance cables
  • Grounding and bonding
  • Panels and enclosures
  • Disconnects
  • Amperage
  • Electrical distribution
  • Wiring types
  • Different types of receptacles, fixtures, and devices
  • Aluminum wiring
  • Knob-and-tube wiring
  • Branch circuit connections
  • Protection of wiring
  • 120-volt terminations
  • Testing electrical components and devices
  • 240-volt terminations
  • GFCI circuits
  • AFCI requirements
  • Lighting circuits
Ability to:
  • Inspect the electrical system
  • Inspect the service drop
  • Inspect the overhead service conductors and attachment point
  • Inspect the service head, gooseneck, and drip loops
  • Inspect the service mast, service conduit, and raceway
  • Inspect the electric meter and base
  • Inspect the service-entrance conductors
  • Inspect the main service disconnect
  • Inspect panelboards
  • Inspect over-current protection devices
  • Inspect service grounding and bonding
  • Inspect switches, fixtures, and receptacles
  • Inspect and test AFCIs (arc-fault circuit interrupters)
  • Inspect and test GFCIs (ground-fault circuit interrupters)
  • Describe the main service disconnect's amperage rating
  • Describe the wiring type
  • Identify knob-and-tube wiring
  • Identify deficiencies in the integrity of service-entrance conductors insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs
  • Identify unused, unfilled circuit-breaker panel openings
  • Identify the presence of solid conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring
  • Identify any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, cover was missing, or device was not functioning properly
  • Identify evidence of arcing or excessive heat
  • Identify an ungrounded receptacle
  • Identify missing smoke detectors
Skill in:
  • Making many observations
  • Using inspection tools
  • Inspection and maintenance procedures
  • Determining defects
  • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
  • Attention to detail
  • Finding defects
  • Electrical safety
 

Task 8: Collect plumbing data.
This task of collecting plumbing data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the Residential Plumbing Overview for Inspectors Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
 
Knowledge of:
  • General terms related to residential plumbing
  • Access requirements for cleaning
  • Clearance requirements for water closets and lavatories
  • Connections, flanges and joints
  • Overflows
  • Automatic clothes washer operation
  • Bathtubs
  • Glazing
  • Bidets
  • Dishwashing machines
  • Floor and trench drains
  • Food-waste grinders
  • Laundry tubs and trays
  • Lavatories or washbasins
  • Showers
  • Sinks
  • Urinals
  • Water closets
  • Whirlpool tubs
  • Faucets and other fixtures
  • Faucet and fixture temperature control
  • Fixture tailpieces
  • Water heaters
  • Water heater as a space heater
  • Sacrificial rods
  • Drain valves
  • Plumbing access
  • Water heater labeling
  • Tankless water heaters
  • Tankless coils from boilers
  • Water heater tank locations
  • Confined space and combustion air
  • Seismic supports for tanks
  • Water valves for tanks
  • Dip tube hole inside tanks
  • Fuel shutoff valves or electric disconnect
  • Temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves
  • Expansion tank on boiler
  • Discharge pipe on TPR valves
  • Water leak catch pans
  • Hot water tank defects
  • Potable water and private wells
  • Potable water contamination
  • Solar energy
  • Water service pipe
  • Water distribution pipe material
  • Water pressure regulator
  • Water pressure and friction
  • Water consumption
  • Size of water supply pipe to fixture
  • Thermal expansion control
  • Gridded and parallel water distribution
  • Lead content of pipes and fittings
  • Water distribution pipe
  • Valves
  • Hot water
  • Sanitary drainage
  • Trenching  
  • Separate sewers
  • Sewage treatment
  • Sanitary drainage pipe material
  • Slope of drainage pipe
  • Change in drain pipe size
  • Breakage and corrosion of pipes
  • Fittings
  • Prohibited joints
  • Cleanouts
  • Drainage system sumps and ejectors
  • Vents
  • Air valves
  • Vent distances
  • Vent terminations
  • Traps
  • Minimum trap size
  • Prohibited traps
  • Trap cleanout
  • Trap defects
  • Protection against pipe damage
  • Plumbing support
  • Storm drainage
  • Dryer system
  • Dryer exhaust system
  • Oil storage tanks
  • Underground fuel-gas piping
  • Support for fuel-gas piping
  • Fuel-gas sediment traps
  • Shut-off valves for fuel-gas appliances
  • Fuel connectors
  • Fuel-gas venting systems
  • Insulation shields
  • Factory-built chimney serving fuel gas
  • Chimney connection
  • Fuel-gas vent terminations
  • Automatic dampers
Ability to:
  • Inspect the plumbing components
  • Count the number of plumbing fixtures
  • Inspect water closets 
  • Inspect automatic clothes washer
  • Inspect bathtubs
  • Inspect bidets
  • Inspect dishwashing machines
  • Inspect food-waste grinders
  • Inspect laundry tubs and trays
  • Inspect lavatories or washbasins
  • Inspect showers
  • Inspect sinks
  • Inspect urinals
  • Inspect whirlpool tubs
  • Inspect faucets and fixtures
  • Inspect water heaters
  • Identify potable water supply
  • Identify private well supply
  • Identify water service pipe
  • Inspect water service pipe
  • Identify water distribution pipe material
  • Inspect valves
  • Inspect sanitary drainage
  • Identify sanitary drainage pipe material
  • Estimate slope of drainage pipe
  • Identify main cleanout
  • Inspect the dryer exhaust system
  • Identify oil storage tanks
  • Identify shut-off valves for fuel-gas appliances
  • Identify factory-built chimney serving fuel gas
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Attention to detail
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Determining defects
    • Finding indications of plumbing leaks
    • Finding indications of moisture intrusion
     
     
    Task 9: Collect attic, ventilation, and insulation data.
    This task of collecting attic, ventilation, and insulation data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • Inspector safety equipment and inspection tools     
    • Building science
    • Insulation effectiveness
    • Insulation placement
    • Heat movement           
    • Moisture movement           
    • Water damage           
    • R-value of insulation           
    • Compressed insulation           
    • Thermal bridging           
    • Precautions about adding insulation           
    • Attic pull-down stairs           
    • Attic insulation rulers and thicknesses           
    • Airtightness        
    • Controlling moisture
    • Blanket insulation          
    • Blown-in and loose-fill insulation          
    • Foam insulation           
    • Rigid insulation           
    • Reflective insulation           
    • Radiant barriers           
    • Insulation labels           
    • Where to look for insulation           
    • Roof ventilation and insulation           
    • Roof vents and insulation clearance           
    • When ventilation is required           
    • Some roof ventilation definitions           
    • Ice dams           
    • Roof ventilation based on climate and insulation amount           
    • How basement walls should dry to the interior           
    • How holes allow air leakage into the basement wall           
    • Required vapor diffusion retarders         
    • Slab-on-grade insulation          
    • Missing slab insulation           
    • Crawlspaces, insulation, and moisture problems           
    • Vented vs. non-vented crawlspaces           
    • Air sealing           
    • Air sealing from the attic           
    • Cathedral roofs, air leaks, and insulation         
    • Blower doors and useful tools to check for air leaks           
    • Air barriers           
    • Vapor diffusion retarders           
    • Inspecting “warm walls” in cold climates           
    • Ventilation of the house's interior air           
    • Natural ventilation           
    • Whole-house ventilation           
    • Energy-recovery ventilation systems           
    • Spot ventilation           
    • Bathroom ventilation ducts and fans           
    • Windows           
    • Safety glass   
    • Floors, walls and ceilings
    Ability to:
    • Identify attic areas
    • Identify the location of insulation in unfinished spaces
    • Identify attic framing components
    • Determine existing ventilation
    • Identify indications of water damage
    • Identify air infiltration points
    • Identify points of access
    • Identify electrical hazards
    • Identify indications of pest/vermin infestations
    • Inspect the attic and roof structures
    • Determine if attic is used for storage
    • Identify the use of radiant barriers
    • Identify ventilation baffles
    • Identify insulation type
    • Estimate insulation thickness or R-value
    • Identify insulation condition
    • Identify the presence and placement of a vapor retarder
    • Identify missing insulation where required or recommended
    • Use a step ladder
    • Use inspector safety equipment and inspection tools
    • Inspect underfloor spaces     
    • Inspect exterior walls
    • Inspect the building envelope
    • Check the ductwork insulation
    • Determine different types of insulation
    • Determine where to look for insulation
    • Estimate roof height at the eave
    • Demonstrate how basement walls should dry to the interior
    • Finding interior foam insulation
    • Look for holes that allow air leakage into the basement wall
    • Identify a vapor diffusion retarder
    • Determine the difference between vented vs. non-vented crawlspaces
    • Identify air sealing methods
    • Determine why an inspector would recommend controlling air leakage
    • Identify air barriers
    • Provide examples of air barriers 
    • Identify vapor diffusion retarders
    • Identify natural ventilation
    • Identify whole-house ventilation
    • Verify bathroom ventilation exhaust
    • Inspect windows
    • Identify indications of condensation in double-paned windows

    Skill in:

    • Making many observations
    • Determining defects
    • Attention to detail
    • Finding indications of attic structural and insulation defects
    • Using inspection tools
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
     
     
    Task 10: Collect wall, ceiling, floor, and interior data.
    This task of collecting wall, ceiling, floor, and interior data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • General wall, floor, and ceiling construction
    • Typical wall framing and components
    • Interior wall-covering materials
    • Interior floor-covering materials
    • Interior ceiling-covering materials
    • How walls dry
    • How moisture moves through walls
    Ability to:
    • Identify wall type
    • Identify wall components
    • Identify flooring materials
    • Identify wall and ceiling materials
    • Identify indications of water or moisture intrusion
    • Identify indications of moisture damage
    • Determine major defects vs. cosmetic
    • Inspect wall, ceiling, and floor trim
    • Identify interior conditions
    • Identify interior wall-covering materials
    • Inspect flashing and trim
    • Inspect interior doors
    • Inspect interior hallways
    • Inspect interior stairs, steps, stairways and ramps
    • Inspect railings, guards and handrails
    • Identify improper spacing at railings and guards
    • Identify framing methods
    • Identify OVE (optimum value engineering) techniques  
    • Identify 2x4 vs. 2x6 wall construction  
    • Determine load-bearing vs. non-load bearing components
    • Estimate wall thickness
    • Estimate wall cavity insulation thickness       
    • Wall sheathing          
    • Identify wall orientation
    • Identify wall cavity depth
    • Identify indications and sources of any moisture intrusion and damage
    • Identify air infiltration points
    • Identify indications of pest infestation and structural damage
    • Identify the orientation of home
    • Identify the upper stories
    Skills in:
    • Observation
    • Basic math
    • Logical thinking
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
     
     
    Task 11: Collect window data.
    This task of collecting window data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:

    • Standards pertaining to window glazing
    • Window construction, components and terminology
    • Window installation methods
    • Window flashing best practices
    Ability to:
    • Identify window type
    • Identify window frame type
    • Identify window glazing type
    • Identify window operation
    • Measure the window area
    • Count the number of windows
    • Identify window orientation
    • Identify general window conditions
    Skill in:
    • Observation
    • Determining defects
    • Attention to detail
     
     
    Task 12: Collect door data.
    This task of collecting door data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • Door components, hardware, and terminology
    • Door construction
    • Door operation and adjustments
    Ability to:
    • Identify door type
    • Measure the door area
    • Count the number of doors
    • Identify door conditions
    • Identify the condition of the door sweep and weatherstripping
    • Identify door hardware condition
    Skill in:
    • Observation
    • Attention to detail
     
     
    Task 13: Collect garage data.
    This task of collecting garage data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • Door components, hardware, and terminology
    • Door construction
    • Door operation and adjustments
    • Firewalls
    • Fire stops
    • Firewall materials
    • Estimate the garage floor's slope
    • Exterior drainage
    • Load-bearing beams and posts
    • Firewall doors
    • Garage door labels
    Ability to:
    • Inspect a garage structure
    • Inspect the garage floor
    • Determine whether the garage is attached or detached 
    • Inspect types of firewalls
    • Identify firewall breaches
    • Inspect sectional garage doors
    • Operate garage door openers
    • Test safety features
    • Operate the manual release of a garage door opener
    • Inspect the electrical supply
    • Attic access
    Skill in:
    • Observation
    • Attention to detail
     
     
     
     
     

    DOMAIN 2: EVALUATE COLLECTED DATA.

     
    Task 1: Evaluate the observations from a visual inspection. 
    This task of evaluating the observations from a visual inspection is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the following courses: Code of Ethics CourseResidential Standards of Practice CourseSafe Practices for the Home Inspector Course25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know CourseResidential Plumbing Overview for Inspectors CourseHow to Perform Residential Electrical Inspections CourseHow to Perform Roof Inspections CourseHow to Inspect HVAC Systems CourseStructural Issues for Home Inspectors CourseHow to Inspect the Exterior CourseHow to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior CourseHow to Perform Deck Inspections CourseHow to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion CourseHow to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves and Chimneys Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 2: Evaluate the health and safety data. 
    This task of evaluating the health and safety data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the Safe Practices for the Home Inspector Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 3: Evaluate the roof data.
    This task of evaluating roof data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Perform Roof Inspections Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a roof condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a roof condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a roof condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with roof repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a roof system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 4: Evaluate exterior data.
    This task of evaluating roof data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Perform Roof Inspections Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a exterior condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a exterior condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a exterior condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with exterior repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a exterior system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 5: Evaluate foundation data.
    This task of evaluating foundation data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the Structural Issues for Home Inspectors Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a foundation condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a foundation condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a foundation condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with foundation repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a foundation system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 6: Evaluate HVAC data.
    This task of evaluating HVAC data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect HVAC Systems Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves and Chimneys Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is an HVAC condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is an HVAC condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is an HVAC condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with HVAC repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if an HVAC system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 7: Evaluate electrical data. 
    This task of evaluating electrical data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Perform Residential Electrical Inspections Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is an electrical condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is an electrical condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is an electrical condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with electrical repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if an electrical system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 8: Evaluate plumbing data.
    This task of evaluating plumbing data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the Residential Plumbing Overview for Inspectors Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a plumbing condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a plumbing condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a plumbing condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with plumbing repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a plumbing system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 9: Evaluate attic, ventilation, and insulation data.
    This task of evaluating attic, ventilation, and insulation data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, the How to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 10: Evaluate wall, ceiling, floor, and interior data.
    This task of evaluating wall, ceiling, floor, and interior data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication

     

     
    Task 11: Evaluate window data.
    This task of evaluating window data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a window condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a window condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a window condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with window repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a window system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 12: Evaluate door data.
    This task of evaluating door data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a door condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a door condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a door condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with door repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a door system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
    Task 13: Evaluate garage data.
    This task of evaluating garage data is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the How to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior Course, the 25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know Course, the Residential Standards of Practice Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    • Costs associated with corrections of material defects
    • Hazards that pose an unreasonable risk to people 
    Ability to:
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a garage condition that requires monitoring
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a garage condition that requires further evaluation
    • Review collected data to determine if there is a garage condition that requires repair or correction by a professional contractor
    • Estimate general costs associated with garage repairs and corrections
    • Review collected data to determine if a garage system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal useful life
    • Review collected data to determine if a defect is both observed and deemed material as defined by the Standards of Practice
    Skill in:
    • Making many observations
    • Recognizing anomalies and patterns
    • Making educated guesses
    • Deductive and inductive reasoning
    • Linking cause and effect
    • Brainstorming
    • Forming generalizations
    • Making predictions of performance
    • Verbal and oral communication
     
     
     
     
     

    DOMAIN 3: COMMUNICATE DATA.

     
    • Task 1: Enter data into reporting software or checklist
    • Task 2: Identify defects in writing
    • Task 3: Communicate in writing the need of correcting defects
     
     
    Task 1: Enter data into reporting software or checklist.
    This task of entering data into reporting software or a checklist is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the Code of Ethics CourseResidential Standards of Practice CourseSafe Practices for the Home Inspector Course25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know CourseResidential Plumbing Overview for Inspectors CourseHow to Perform Residential Electrical Inspections CourseHow to Perform Roof Inspections CourseHow to Inspect HVAC Systems CourseStructural Issues for Home Inspectors CourseHow to Inspect the Exterior CourseHow to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior CourseHow to Perform Deck Inspections CourseHow to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion CourseHow to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves and Chimneys Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports

    Knowledge of:
    • Basic construction terms
    • Various types of inspection report writing software or checklist
    • Digital photography
    Ability to:
    • Gather all information and data pertaining to the inspection
    • Enter the data into the software or checklist
    • Evaluate the output from the software or checklist
    • Produce a written report
    • Use a computer
    • Use a camera
    Skill in:
    • Typing
    • Communication
    • Imagery and digital representations
    • Producing a written report
     
     
    Task 2: Identify defects in writing.
    This task of identifying defects in writing is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the Code of Ethics CourseResidential Standards of Practice CourseSafe Practices for the Home Inspector Course25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know CourseResidential Plumbing Overview for Inspectors CourseHow to Perform Residential Electrical Inspections CourseHow to Perform Roof Inspections CourseHow to Inspect HVAC Systems CourseStructural Issues for Home Inspectors CourseHow to Inspect the Exterior CourseHow to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior CourseHow to Perform Deck Inspections CourseHow to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion CourseHow to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves and Chimneys Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice 
    • The definition of a material defect
    • Standards adopted by the local jurisdiction
    Ability to:
    • Communicate in writing defects within specific systems and components defined by the InterNACHI Standards of Practice that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector
    Skill in:
    • Written communication
    • Typing
    • Communication
    • Producing a written report
    • Imagery and digital representations
     

    Task 3: Communicate, in writing, the need of correcting defects.  
    This task of communicating in writing the need of correcting defects is established by the specific, measurable educational performance objectives listed in the Code of Ethics CourseResidential Standards of Practice CourseSafe Practices for the Home Inspector Course25 Standards Every Inspector Should Know CourseResidential Plumbing Overview for Inspectors CourseHow to Perform Residential Electrical Inspections CourseHow to Perform Roof Inspections CourseHow to Inspect HVAC Systems CourseStructural Issues for Home Inspectors CourseHow to Inspect the Exterior CourseHow to Inspect the Attic, Insulation, Ventilation and Interior CourseHow to Perform Deck Inspections CourseHow to Inspect for Moisture Intrusion CourseHow to Inspect Fireplaces, Stoves and Chimneys Course, and Writing and Submitting 4 Mock Inspection Reports
     
    Knowledge of:
    • InterNACHI's Standards of Practice 
    • The definition of a material defect
    • Systems and components defined by the Standards of Practice
    • Defects defined by the Standards of Practice as in need of correction
    Ability to:
    • Describe observed indications of defects
    • Communicate in writing 
    Skill in:
    • Verbal communication
    • Listening
    • Speaking
    • Writing inspection report narratives
    • Describing, in written format, systems and components defined by the Standards of Practice
    • Reporting, in written format, defects defined by the Standards of Practice as in need of correction
    • Identifying, in writing, defects within specific systems and components defined by the Standards of Practice that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector. 
     
     
     
     

    Exam Blueprint

    Examinations are developed using an a general examination blueprint -- a tool used design examinations. The blueprint, also referred to as a test specification, identifies the content areas covered on an examination. For each content area, the blueprint outlines the domains and tasks, and the proportion of each represented in the examination. Students are encouraged to use the examination blueprint to prepare for the examination, keeping in mind that the blueprint may not include all topics listed in the course outline. 
     
     Domains and Tasks
    Domain 1:
    Collect Home Data
    75%
     
    Task 1: Conduct a visual inspection.
    8%
     
    Task 2: Collect health and safety data.
    4%
     
    Task 3: Collect roof data.
    6%
     
    Task 4: Collect exterior data.
    7%
     
    Task 5: Collect foundation data.
    6%
     
    Task 6: Collect heating, ventilation and air condition (HVAC) system data.
    8%
     
    Task 7: Collect electrical data.
    6%
     
    Task 8: Collect plumbing data.
    7%
     
    Task 9: Collect attic, ventilation, and insulation data.
    6%
     
    Task 10: Collect wall, ceiling, floor, and interior data.
    4%
     
    Task 11: Collect window data.
    4%
     
    Task 12: Collect door data.
    3%
     
    Task 13: Collect garage data.
    3%
     
     
     
    Domain 2:
    Evaluate Collected Data
    15%
     
    Task 1: Evaluate the observations from a visual inspection.
    1%
     
    Task 2: Evaluate health and safety data.
    1%
     
    Task 3: Evaluate roof data.
    1%
     
    Task 4: Evaluate exterior data.
    1%
     
    Task 5: Evaluate foundation data.
    1%
     
    Task 6: Evaluate HVAC data.
    1%
     
    Task 7: Evaluate electrical data.
    1%
     
    Task 8: Evaluate plumbing data.
    1%
     
    Task 9: Evaluate attic, ventilation, and insulation data.
    1%
     
    Task 10: Evaluate wall, ceiling, floor, and interior data.
    1%
     
    Task 11: Evaluate window data.
    1%
     
    Task 12: Evaluate door data.
    1%
     
    Task 13: Evaluate garage data.
    1%
     
     
     
    Domain 3:
    Communicate Data
    10%
     
    Task 1: Enter data into reporting software or checklist.
    3%
     
    Task 2: Identify defects in writing.
    3%
     
    Task 3: Communicate, in writing, the need of correcting defects.
    4%